Bryan Alvarez

  • Everybody's talking about the weather? Metmen in Wartime is a detailed account of the meteorological services in practice in Canada during World War II. Why were forecasts so crucial during the war? For anti-submarine warfare and convoy protection operations from bases along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. But Metmen is also a thorough examination of the men behind the forecasts: the nearly 400 science graduates who became "metmen" and were stationed at flying training schools. This book explains the importance of aviation weather forecasts and instruction in meteorology for student pilots at the Royal Canadian Air Force stations established under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Cooperation with the United States military weather services is also examined.

  • What went wrong with WCW?

    In 1997, World Championship Wrestling was on top. It was the number-one pro wrestling company in the world, and the highest-rated show on cable television. Each week, fans tuned in to Monday Nitro, flocked to sold-out arenas, and carried home truckloads of WCW merchandise. Sting, Bill Goldberg, and the New World Order were household names. Superstars like Dennis Rodman and KISS jumped on the WCW bandwagon. It seemed the company could do no wrong.

    But by 2001, however, everything had bottomed out. The company - having lost a whopping 95% of its audience - was sold for next to nothing to Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment. WCW was laid to rest.

    How could the company lose its audience so quickly? Who was responsible for shows so horrible that fans fled in horror? What the hell happened to cause the death of one of the largest wrestling companies in the world? The Death of World Championship Wrestling is the first book to take readers through a detailed dissection of WCW's downfall.

  • The unauthorized history of one of the most popular movies of all time. Released in 1967, Planet of the Apes was a top-ten box-office hit that captivated audiences with its provocative vision of the future. Over the next decade it spawned four sequels, a television series, an animated series, two comic books, and hundreds of merchandise tie-ins. To some, the Apes projects were a campy, sci-fi blast, with colourful characters and delightfully over-the-top performances. But others took the stories more seriously, as allegories on man's struggles with such issues as race, intolerance, and protecting of the environment.
    Though there hasn't been a new Apes movie since 1974, the popularity of the original films and TV series has endured and, if anything, expanded in the interim. When director Tim Burton's remake of the original Planet of the Apes is released in the summer of 2001, interest in the phenomenon is certain to be rekindled on a prodigious scale. 
    Planet of the Apes: An Unofficial Companion is a comprehensive look at all aspects of Planet of the Apes, featuring interviews, reviews, complete cast and credit information, and a behind-the-scenes look at what made this quirky science-fiction series an enduring classic.

empty