Mike Harrison

  • Prenez votre envol !Dans un futur post-apocalyptique, les hommes ont quitté la terre pour le ciel et vivent désormais dans des forteresses volantes. Cola, jeune pilote descendant d'une famille d'aviateurs, se bat tous les jours pour protéger des pirates de l'air sa cité alimentée par l'énergie solaire. Car les réserves de munition et de carburant se tarissent peu à peu, et les hommes deviennent prêts à tout pour survivre. Chaque jour, le ciel s'embrase du feu des batailles entre avions et guerriers aéroportés. Et le monde sombre peu à peu dans le chaos...Dans un univers évoquant autant le Nausicäa de Miyazaki qu'une version aérienne de Waterworld, Wild Blue Yonder nous embarque pour une aventure époustouflante aux confins du ciel.

  • ?The Bayou is a world of its own - a marshy, sometimes treacherous, oft-times sinister land of creeping darkness and living shadows, secret legends and vivid mythology. It is that darkness and those shadows that permeate Bayou Underground, the first study of the Louisiana music scene ever to leave behind the bright lights of big city New Orleans, and plunge instead into the wilderness that not only surrounds the Big Easy, but which stretches for hundreds of miles on either side, from Houston, Texas, to Mobile, Alabama.

    Bayou Underground explores the music of the region from the House of the Rising Sun to gator hunting with Amos Moses (the one-armed Cajun backwoodsman created by country songwriter Jerry Reed) to artists like Bo Diddley, Nick Cave, Bob Dylan, and Creedence Clearwater Revival, who were influenced by unsung heroes of the Bayou.

    In Bayou Underground, the people and the cultures that have called the bayou home are unearthed through their words and lives, but most of all through the music that has, over the last century, either arisen from the swamplands themselves, or been drawn from fellow visitors to the region, as they seek to set down for posterity the emotions, dreams, and enchantments that the area instilled in them.

    Part social history, part epic travelogue, and partly a lament for a way of life that has now all but disappeared, Bayou Underground is the gripping story of American music's forgotten childhood, and the parentage it barely even knows about. By comparison, the Big Easy had it easy.

  • Wild Thing

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    When Eddie receives an early morning call for help, he catches the next plane to Britain. His friend, Dr. Peter Maurice, a renowned psychologist on a UK book tour with his wife Sylvia, has been accused of multiple, brutal murders and is about to be arrested.

    Eddie learns that the deadly intrigue goes further back than the present time - to a two-hundred-year-old manuscript, written by Franz Anton Mesmer, and recently purchased by Dr. Maurice. The manuscript, written in Old Italian, appears to be a catalyst that sparks killing sprees, as history shows that Mesmer's great-great-granddaughter, who smuggled the manuscript out of East Germany, became the first of many women to die horribly at the hands of a demented serial killer. But what's the connection?

    Eddie arranges to have the manuscript translated, but when he goes to collect it, he discovers the translator dead, her head brutally crushed by a killer who specializes in breaking bones very slowly. Eddie's investigation unearths gruesome information about England's notorious Newgate Prison, once frequented by Mesmer but long since burned to the ground.

    The paparazzi are all over Eddie and Dr. Maurice's wife as Eddie works to disprove Scotland Yard's claim that Dr. Maurice is a monster. Eddie is determined to help the good Doctor and prove the police wrong. But are they?

  • Linus Pauling, one of the most celebrated scientists of the twentieth century, once remarked that satisfying curiosity is one of the greatest sources of pleasure in life. Dr. Joe and What You Didn't Know aims to act as both the source and satiation of such curiosity, providing pleasure through a series of 99 chemistry-related questions and answers designed to both inform and entertain. Ranging from the esoteric to the everyday, Dr. Joe Schwarcz tackles topics from Beethoven's connection to plumbing to why rotten eggs smell like rotten eggs.

    How did a sheep, a duck, and a rooster usher in the age of air travel? What jewelry metal is prohibited in some European countries? What does Miss Piggy have to do with the World Cup? And is there really any danger in eating green potatoes? Whimsical though these questions may be, their answers are revealed in an accessible scientific fashion.

    In addition to a few chuckles and some scientific savvy, Dr. Joe and What You Didn't Know provides the reader with sound practical advice. You'll learn how to prevent brown sugar from lumping and why thin French fries may be healthier than fat ones. The secrets behind windshield washer fluid and "carbonless" carbon paper are revealed. And if you didn't know how to remove a cockroach from your ear, Dr. Joe will give you some guidance. That advice alone might prove worth the price of the book.

  • Paul Menzies is an out-of-shape, middle-aged advertising executive, who arrives at work one morning to discover he's lost his job. Downsized. That evening, he stops by a bank machine to check his finances. Ahead of him, a scruffy young couple is arguing about the state of their own finances. When the muscular husband, Victor Shriver, loses his temper and smacks his wife hard, Paul steps in and hauls the young thug backwards across the lobby. Which is the only clear image caught by the bank's security camera.

    In the ensuing brawl, Shriver puts Paul in hospital for nearly a week. Despite the severity of his injuries, the cops have little choice but to lay charges against Paul for assault. Victor Shriver has found himself a sharp little lawyer, and between them they smell money, asking for $50,000. Instead Paul offers to fight Victor, mano a mano, in a boxing ring. Three rounds. If Shriver wins, Paul will pay him and the assault charges will be dropped. If Paul wins, no money changes hands and the assault charges will still be dropped. When she realizes there's nothing she can do to dissuade her husband, Paul's feisty wife, Valerie Menzies, hires Eddie Dancer to stop the fight. But it's too little, too late and when the heat of the media spotlight focuses on the "mismatched fight of the year," even Eddie realizes he's beaten. As the world's press and the TV networks pour into town for the main event, Eddie finds himself reliving some unresolved issues of spousal abuse from his own past. And once that lid is off, there's no way Eddie can ever get it back on again.

  • Long after his death, Glenn Gould still lures new listeners to his piano, connecting with them on a haunting, personal level. "He feels and you feel," says young New York writer Nicole Spectre. "I can feel his pain and joy - it touches me. He speaks directly to me."

    But when he was known as the world's greatest pianist in the 1950s and 1960s, just who was Gould playing for? His audience? Himself? His demanding mother? All are likely true, but he was also richly inspired by - and bared his soul at the keyboard to - a secret society of women, the girlfriends who stirred his hard-to-fetch emotions: Franny Batchen, Verna Sandercock, Cornelia Foss, Roxolana Roslak, and Monica Gaylord.

    Of the eighteen books and nineteen documentaries by or about the most compelling virtuoso of the twentieth century, none have contained details about Gould's many love affairs and how they affected his life, his music, and his filmmaking. Until now, biographers have tried to explain what came out of the music box, not the engine that drove it. The vault to his private life has remained locked since his untimely death in 1982 because of his obsessions with privacy and controlling his image, the loyalty of his carefully chosen friends and lovers, and the choice that biographers made to focus safely on his music and eccentricities.

    The Secret Life of Glenn Gould will be the first true exposé of Gould, who until now has been assumed to be asexual, lonely, and egocentric, by examining his love and soul-mate relationships. His music was twelve-tonal and his documentaries "contrapuntal" - both were filled with overlapping voices - and so was his private life.

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