William Dean Howells

  • Unless she was out of her mind there was no way of accounting for her behavior...
    Nowhere in the prodigious output of William Dean Howells is there an example more poignant of his heart-felt dedication to the realist movement than this achingly suspensfull novella.
    The story centers on a young "alienist"--a psychologist--who meets a young woman who, at subsequent encounters, has no recollection of him. The doctor launches a psychological investigation that appears to be based upon the most painful memories of the author himself--Howells had recently experienced the loss of a beloved adult daughter (from what appears to have been anorexia) and the institutionalization of another for "emotional collapse."
    The story's surprising ending reveals not only the author's deft sense of craftsmanship, but speaks movingly to his enduring faith in the sublime power of literature.
    The Art of The Novella Series
    Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the ART OF THE NOVELLA series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

  • Set against a vividly depicted background of fin de siécle New York, this novel centers on the conflict between a self-made millionaire and a fervent social revolutionary-a conflict in which a man of goodwill futilely attempts to act as a mediator, only to be forced himself into a crisis of conscience. Here we see William Dean Howells's grasp of the realities of the American experience in an age of emerging social struggle. His absolute determination to fairly represent every point of view is evident throughout this multifaceted work. Both a memorable portrait of an era and a profoundly moving study of human relationships, A Hazard of New Fortunes fully justifies Alfred Kazin's ranking of Howells as "the first great domestic novelist of American life."

  • The Rise of Silas Lapham was the first important novel to center on the American businessman and the first to treat its theme with a realism that foreshadowed the work of modern writers. In his story of one of the millionaire industrialists who flourished in the post-Civil War years, William Dean Howells probes the moral and social conflicts that confront a self-made man trying to crash Bostons old-guard aristocracy. Silas Lapham is a man of conscience who fully realizes his folly; but he is also an ambitious man who lets his aspirations lead him to risk both his fortune and his familys happiness for status in a society that will never truly accept him.His perceptions were sure, his integrity was absolute, wrote Henry Seidel Canby of William Dean Howells, whom he credited as being responsible for giving the American novel form.


  • This carefully crafted ebook: "The Mark Twain Autobiography + 3 Biographies" contains 4 Mark Twain Biographies in 1 book and is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents.
    Mark Twain began writing his autobiography long before the 1906 publications of these Chapters from my Autobiography. He originally planned to have his memoirs published only after his death but realized, once he'd passed his 70th year, that a lot of the material might be OK to publish before his departure. These chapters were published in serial form in the North American Review during 1906-1907. While much of the material consists of stories about the people, places and incidents of his long life, there're also several sections from his daughter.
    In My Mark Twain, Howells pens a literary memoir that includes such fascinating scenes as their meetings with former president Ulysses Grant who was then writing the classic autobiography that Twain would underwrite in the largest publishing deal until that time. But it is also notable for its affectionate descriptions of his friend's family life during Howell's many visits to the Twain residences in Hartford and Stormfield.
    Mark Twain A Biography and The Boys' Life Of Mark Twain written by Albert Bigelow Paine, are an invaluable resource to better understand Twain, the stories behind his stories and his life with those he loved and with whom he worked.


    Table of Contents:
    Chapters From My Autobiography By Mark Twain
    My Mark Twain By William Dean Howells'
    Mark Twain A Biography By Albert Bigelow Paine
    The Boys' Life Of Mark Twain By Albert Bigelow Paine



    Mark Twain (pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens) (1835-1910), quintessential American humorist, lecturer, essayist, and author wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
    William Dean Howells (1837-1920) was an American realist author and literary critic. He was particularly known for his tenure as editor of the Atlantic Monthly as well as his own prolific writings, including the Christmas story "Christmas Every Day" and the novel The Rise of Silas Lapham.
    Albert Bigelow Paine (1861 - 1937) was Mark Twain's biographer. He lived with Twain, collecting ideas and material for a biography, for a few years before Twain's death in 1910.

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