Arbeiter Ring Publishing

  • All We Want is Everything, Andrew F. Sullivan's exceptional debut collection of short stories, finds the misused and forgotten, the places in between, the borderlands on the edge of town where dead fields alternate with empty warehouses-places where men and women clutch tightly at whatever fragments remain. Motels are packed with human cargo, while parole is just another state of being. Christmas dinners become battlegrounds; truck cabs and bathroom stalls transform into warped confessionals; and stories are told and retold, held out by people stumbling towards one another in the dark. Frightening, hilarious, filled with raging impotence and moments of embattled grace, All We Want is Everything is the advent of a tremendous new literary voice.

  • Many promote Reconciliation as a "new" way for Canada to relate to Indigenous Peoples. In Dancing on Our Turtle's Back: Stories of Nishnaabeg Re-Creation, Resurgence, and a New Emergence activist, editor, and educator Leanne Betasamosake Simpson asserts reconciliation must be grounded in political resurgence and must support the regeneration of Indigenous languages, oral cultures, and traditions of governance.

    Simpson explores philosophies and pathways of regeneration, resurgence, and a new emergence through the Nishnaabeg language, Creation Stories, walks with Elders and children, celebrations and protests, and meditations on these experiences. She stresses the importance of illuminating Indigenous intellectual traditions to transform their relationship to the Canadian state.

    Challenging and original, Dancing on Our Turtle's Back provides a valuable new perspective on the struggles of Indigenous Peoples.

  • Set in the fictional town of Fletcher, the connected stories in Smells Like Heaven span thirty years. Fletcher is a town the characters strive to escape, but keep returning to, as they stumble through life searching for ways to connect and transcend their claustrophobic pasts. Following two sisters-Devon and Christine-as well as their friends and lovers, Smells Like Heaven exposes the core of what it means to be transformed by love.

  • In this time of economic, ecological and social crises, a diverse array of collective movements carry the possibilities of deep democratization and alternative futures. A World to Win brings these movements alive as agents of history-in-the-making. It situates Quebec student strikers, Indigenous resistance and resurgence, Occupy, workers, migrant, feminist and queer movements and many others in their struggle against the hegemonic institutions of capitalism. Using theory and case studies, this book articulates the particular histories and structures facing social movements while also building bridges to comprehensive analyses of our current era of crisis and change-in Canada and the world.

  • Set against a backdrop of the 2012 student protests, Accordéon is an experimental novel, a piercing deconstruction of Québécois culture, and an ode to Montréal-a city where everything happens at once and all realities exist simultaneously. Against a satirical Ministry of Culture set on quotas, preservation, and containment according to its own cultural code, Kaie Kellough weaves voices and images from the margins to probe collective fantasies of Québec old and new.

  • Surviving Canada: Indigenous Peoples Celebrate 150 Years of Betrayal (ARP Books) is a collection of elegant, thoughtful, and powerful reflections about Indigenous Peoples' complicated, and often frustrating, relationship with Canada, and how-even 150 years after Confederation-the fight for recognition of their treaty and Aboriginal rights continues. Through essays, art, and literature, Surviving Canada examines the struggle for Indigenous Peoples to celebrate their cultures and exercise their right to control their own economic development, lands, water, and lives. The Indian Act, Idle No More, and the legacy of residential schools are just a few of the topics covered by a wide range of elders, scholars, artists, and activists. Contributors include Mary Eberts, Buffy Sainte-Marie, and Leroy Little Bear.

  • In her debut collection of short stories, Islands of Decolonial Love, renowned writer and activist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson vividly explores the lives of contemporary Indigenous Peoples and communities, especially those of her own Nishnaabeg nation. Found on reserves, in cities and small towns, in bars and curling rinks, canoes and community centres, doctors offices and pickup trucks, Simpson's characters confront the often heartbreaking challenge of pairing the desire to live loving and observant lives with a constant struggle to simply survive the historical and ongoing injustices of racism and colonialism. Told with voices that are rarely recorded but need to be heard, and incorporating the language and history of her people, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson's Islands of Decolonial Love is a profound, important, and beautiful book of fiction.

  • Residents of the fictional edge city of Wississauga are embroiled in a fight over the fate of a riverbed running behind their homes. Their paths intersect, bringing personal dilemmas and self-deceptions to the forefront. Has June discovered bones of the first inhabitants in her backyard? Will Tim learn the truth about his parents? Can Charlie make a connection she so desperately needs? Reinforcing his position as a cultural soothsayer, Hal Niedzviecki offers a view of the suburbs in a slightly askew world. With humour and insight, he examines how we project, or reflect, ourselves in our collective and individual histories, and challenges our views of identity and home.

  • Glorifying consumerism as the de facto religion of our time, Shopping Cart Pantheism offers a preposterous yet challenging invitation to participate in commodity worship. As our narrator meanders the Las Vegas Strip, its sites and monuments become examples of Christian sainthood, miracles, worship, and dogma now transformed into icons of consumerism. Satiric, witty, and deeply insightful, Shopping Cart Pantheism reveals the fraught beginnings of the twenty-first century's most pervasive neurosis.

  • Small Predatorsfollows a collective of student activists as they cope with the aftermath of a violent political demonstration carried out against their university by a member of their collective, Mink. The story's narrator, Fox, recounts Mink's addiction to a form of physical self-harm, both a violence motivated by guilt of privilege and a method of coping with political vulnerability. As Fox navigates her anger with Mink, debating whether or not she should confront or forgive her, we discover that each member of the collective is performing their own acts of self-violence. As Canadian millennials, Fox and her friends were born into the era of climate anxiety-told again and again that more must be done to save humanity's future at the same time that pipelines were expanded, rainforests were cleared, and chemical waste was dumped into the ocean. Struggling to imagine a resistance that isn't futile, the young activists turn violently on themselves and each other, creating sites of political action and care within their physical bodies. This vibrant debut combines prose with lists, poetry, and structural experimentation.

  • Drawing on interviews with 51 anti-authoritarian organizers to investigates what it means to struggle for "the commons" within a settler colonial context, Unsettling the Commons (ARP Books) interrogates a very important debate that took place within Occupy camps and is taking place in a multitude of movements in North America around what it means to claim "the commons" on stolen land. Travelling back in history to show the ways in which radical left movements have often either erased or come into clear conflict with Indigenous practices of sovereignty and self-determination-all in the name of the "struggle for the commons", the book argues that there are multiple commons or conceptualizations of how land, relationships, and resources are shared, produced, consumed, and distributed in any given society. As opposed to the liberal politics of recognition, a political practice of unsettling and a recognition of the incommensurability of political goals that claim access to space/territory on stolen land is put forward as a more desirable way forward.

  • Written from a female and Indigenous perspective, the poems in Indianland incorporate Anishinaabemowin throughout. Lesley Belleau explores rich themes of sexuality, birth, memory, and longing, as well as touchstone issues in Indigenous politics including Elijah Harper, Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, forced sterilizations, and Kanesatake with immediacy and intimacy. This multiform collection moves from present day to first contact and back to the present, immersing us in images of blood, plants (milkweed, yarrow, cattails), and petroglyphs, and grounding the book in the beloved land of which it speaks.

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