Knopf Canada Digital

  • Nigella Christmas comprises reliable, practical, easy-to-follow recipes and inspiring and reassuring advice, presented in a gorgeous package that will make this the ultimate gift to yourself, your family and friends.
    Nigella Christmas will surely become an all-time perennial favourite, the book we will all reach for - for minimum stress and maximum enjoyment - at holiday season.
    Recipes include everything from Christmas cakes and puddings to quick homemade presents (cookies and chutneys); food to cook and freeze ahead; oven slow-cooking; "hero" ingredients; as well as party food and drinks. And, of course, exciting and inspiring variations for the Main Event - from traditional turkey, festive ham and special trimmings; to a Swedish or Polish Christmas à la Nigella; to a vegetarian Christmas feast.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Anglais Kitchen

    Lawson Nigella

    Kitchen tells the story of the life of the kitchen, through the food we eat now and the way we live, in the most important room of the house.
    Compendious, informative and utterly engaging, Kitchen brings us feel-good food for cooks and eaters that is comforting but always seductive, nostalgic but with a modern twist -- whether express-style easy-exotic recipes for the weekday rush, leisurely slow-cook dishes for weekends and special occasions, or irresistible cakes and cookies as the Domestic Goddess rides again. It answers everyday cooking quandaries -- what to give the kids for lunch, how to rustle up a meal for friends in moments, or what to do about those black bananas, wrinkled apples and bullet-hard plums -- and since real cooking is so often about leftovers, here one recipe can morph into another... from ham hocks to pea soup and pasties, from chicken to Chinatown salad. This isn't just about being thrifty but about being creative and seeing how recipes come about and evolve. As well as offering the reader a mouthwatering array of inspired new recipes -- from clams with chorizo to Guinness gingerbread, from Asian braised beef to flourless chocolate lime cake, from pasta Genovese to Venetian carrot cake -- Nigella rounds up her no-nonsense Kitchen Kit and Caboodle must-haves (and, crucially, what isn't needed) in the way of equipment and magical standby ingredients. But above all, she reminds the reader how much pleasure there is to be had in realfood and in reclaiming the traditional rhythms of the kitchen, as she cooks to the beat of the heart of the home, creating simple, delicious recipes to make life less complicated.
    The expansive, lively narrative, with its rich feast of food, makes this new work a natural 21st-century successor to Nigella's classic How To Eat, this time with a wealth of photographs from the instructive to the glorious.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Nigella Lawson and her style of cookery have earned a special place in our lives, symbolizing all that is best, most pleasurable, most hands-on and least fussy about good food. But that doesn';t mean she wants us to spend hours in the kitchen slaving over a hot stove.
    Featuring fabulous fast foods, ingenious short cuts, terrific time-saving ideas and easy, delicious meals, Nigella Express is her solution to eating well when time is short. Here are mouthwatering recipes, quick to prepare and easy to follow, that you can conjure up after a long day in the office or on a busy weekend. When time is precious, you can';t spend hours shopping or cooking, so you need to make life easier by being prepared. This is food you can make as you hit the kitchen running, with vital tips on how to keep your store cupboard stocked, and your fridge and freezer stacked. Not that the recipes are basic-though they are always simple-but it';s important to make every ingredient earn its place in a recipe. Minimize effort by maximizing taste. And here, too, is great food that can be prepared quickly but cooked slowly in the oven, leaving you time to have a bath or a drink, talk to friends or do homework with your children. It';s minimum stress for maximum enjoyment.
    This is a new generation of fast food-never basic, never dull, always do-able, quick and delicious. The Domestic Goddess is back and this time it';s instant.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • W. G. Sebald completed this extraordinary, important and controversial book before his untimely death in December 2001. It is a harrowing study of the devastation of German cities by Allied bombardment in World War II, and an examination of the silence in German literature and culture about this unprecedented trauma. @20@On the Natural History of Destruction@21@ is an essential and deeply relevant study of war and society, suffering and amnesia. Like Sebald@95@#8217;s novels, it is studded with meticulous observation, moments of black humour, and throughout, the author@95@#8217;s unmatched intelligence and humanity.@16@@16@@16@@18@From the Trade Paperback edition.@19@

  • Anglais Ascension

    Steven Galloway

    The acclaimed author of Finnie Walsh turns from small-town hockey to the extraordinary intrigues of circus life during the heyday of the Big Top through the story of Salvo Ursari, undisputed master of the high wire.
    As the novel opens, it is the summer of 1976. Salvo is 66 years old and has decided he can never retire. Already famous thanks to his days in an American circus, he has made a living in recent times performing solo walks of extraordinary difficulty. And so he finds himself attempting to accomplish the most difficult feat of his career: to walk a wire strung between the twin towers of the World Trade Center, 1350 feet from the ground.
    Transylvania in 1919 is a place of poverty and persecution for the Rom people. Salvo follows his father to a village church, where the senior Ursari -- the only man who volunteers for the task -- is to climb the steeple to replace a large iron crucifix that had been removed for safe-keeping during the war. He restores the cross, but it is not properly attached and as they are leaving, it falls, killing a priest. When the villagers exact their revenge, Salvo's parents are killed and he is separated from his brother and sister. Thus begins nearly a lifetime of being forced to flee from suspicion and misfortune that takes the reader from Europe to the US to British Columbia's Fraser Valley and back to Manhattan.
    Ascension combines powerful storytelling -- including stories of the Romany people, poverty-stricken but resourceful, and rich in legend -- with great surprise and originality; Steven Galloway makes it clear why he is one of the hottest young writers in Canada today.
    Excerpt from Ascension
    "Once a newspaper man had asked him what it felt like to walk high above the crowd, with death looming beneath you and success a long way off on the other platform. Salvo had told the man that it was like being a bird, an eagle, but he knew that wasn't true at all. He was a man, nothing more. Still, he was a man who dared do things other men watched and admired and were jealous of. He walked for these people as much as for anyone. But today he was walking only for himself. That was the difference with these solo walks. When he was among them, he was one of them, but here he is timeless, one man on a wire far above it all, in a separate place. He was not free, but he was as free as he would ever be."
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Owen Meany, the only child of a New Hampshire granite quarrier, believes he is God's instrument; he is. This is John Irving's most comic novel, yet Owen Meany is Mr. Irving's most heartbreaking character.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • International Bestseller
    Shortlisted for the 1998 Giller Prize
    A Globe and Mail Notable Book of 1998
    Over 40,000 copies sold in hardcover
    In A Recipe for Bees, Gail Anderson-Dargatz gives readers a remarkable woman to stand beside Hagar Shipley and Daisy Goodwin -- but Augusta Olsen also has attitude, a wicked funny bone, and the dubious gift of second sight.
    At home in Courtenay, B.C., Augusta anxiously awaits news of her dearly loved son-in-law Gabe, who is undergoing brain surgery miles away in Victoria. Her best friend Rose is waiting for Augusta to call as soon as she hears. Through Rose, we begin to learn the story of Augusta's sometimes harsh, sometimes magical life: the startling vision of her mother's early death; the loneliness of her marriage to Karl and her battle with Karl's detestable father, Olaf. We are told of her gentle, platonic affair with a church minister, of her not-so-platonic affair with a man from the town, and the birth of her only child. We also learn of the special affinity between Rose and Augusta, who share the delights and exasperations of old age.
    Just as The Cure for Death by Lightning offers recipes and remedies, A Recipe for Bees is saturated with bee lore, and is full of rich domestic detail, wondrous imagery culled from rural kitchens and gardens, shining insights into ageing, family and friendship. And at its heart, is the life, death and resurrection of an extraordinary marriage
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • ‘Light and fast-moving, unburdened by library research but filled with erudition’ New Yorker Oliver Sacks, the bestselling author of Awakenings and The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, is most famous for his studies of the human mind: insightful and beautifully characterized portraits of those experiencing complex neurological conditions. However, he has another scientific passion: the fern. Since childhood Oliver has been fascinated by the ability of these primitive plants to survive and adapt in many climates. Oaxaca Journal is the enthralling account of his trip, alongside a group of fellow fern enthusiasts, to the beautiful province of Oaxaca, Mexico. Bringing together Oliver’s endless curiosity about natural history and the richness of human culture with his sharp eye for detail, this book is a captivating evocation of a place, its plants, its people, and its myriad wonders. ‘Like all the best journals, it has a rich immediacy . . . the book is a rare treat.’ Globe and Mail ‘Sacks’s boundless curiosity is always a reward’ New York Times

  • In the latest endearing installment in the bestselling No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency series, our resourceful heroine, Precious Ramotswe, whose primary mission is to help people with the problems in their lives, has her hands full.
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    Precious Ramotswe is called in to tackle a disciplinary problem at a local school. Mysteries involving children are always rather difficult, and in this case, making this more complicated is the fact that it's her adopted daughter's school. Meanwhile, her trusted assistant, Grace Makutsi, is having trouble adjusting to wedded bliss, a problem that may test even Precious Ramotswe's formidable talents. Finally, Mma Ramotswe and Mma Makutsi meet an old mentor for the first time, when the estimable Clovis Andersen, author of their personal manual, Principles of Private Investigation, arrives in Botswana on a case. All this and bush tea toolife is indeed rich in Botswana.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • One freezing winter morning a dead body is found in the backyard of the Dharma family’s house. It’s the body of Anu Krishnan.
    For Anu, a writer seeking a secluded retreat from the city, the Dharmas’ “back-house” in the sleepy mountain town of Merrit’s Point was the ideal spot to take a year off and begin writing. She had found the Dharmas’ rental through a happy coincidence. A friend from university who had kept tabs on everyone in their graduating year – including the quiet and reserved Vikram Dharma and his first wife, Helen – sent her the listing. Anu vaguely remembered Vikram but had a strong recollection of Helen, a beautiful, vivacious, social and charming woman.
    But now Vikram had a new wife, a marriage hastily arranged in India after Helen was killed in a car accident. Suman Dharma, a stark contrast to Helen, is quiet and timid. She arrived from the bustling warmth of India full of the promise of her new life – a new home, a new country and a daughter from Vikram’s first marriage. But her husband’s suspicious, controlling and angry tirades become almost a daily ritual, resigning Suman to a desolate future entangled in a marriage of fear and despair.
    Suman is isolated both by the landscape and the culture, and her fortunes begin to change only when Anu arrives. A friendship begins to form between the two women as Anu becomes a frequent visitor to the house. While the children, Varsha and Hemant, are at school, Anu, Vikram’s mother, Akka, and Suman spend time sharing tea and stories.
    But Anu’s arrival will change the balance of the Dharma household. Young Varsha, deeply affected by her mother’s death and desperate to keep her new family together, becomes increasingly suspicious of Anu’s relationship with her stepmother. Varsha’s singular attention to keeping her family together, and the secrets that emerge as Anu and Suman become friends, create cracks in the Dharma family that can only spell certain disaster.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Rudy Wiebe's latest novel is at once an enthralling saga of the Mennonite people and one man's emotional voyage into his heritage and his own self-discovery. Ambitious in its historical sweep, tender and humane, Sweeter Than All the World takes us on an extraordinary odyssey never before fully related in a contemporary novel.
    The novel tells the story of the Mennonite people from the early days of persecution in sixteenth-century Netherlands, and follows their emigration to Danzig, London, Russia, and the Americas, through the horrors of World War II, to settlement in Paraguay and Canada. It is told episodically in a double-stranded narrative. The first strand consists of different voices of historical figures. The other narrative voice is that of Adam Wiebe, born in Saskatchewan in 1935, whom we encounter at telling stages of his life: as a small boy playing in the bush, as a student hunting caribou a week before his wedding, and as a middle-aged man carefully negotiating a temporary separation from his wife. As Adam faces the collapse of his marriage and the disappearance of his daughter, he becomes obsessed with understanding his ancestral past. Wiebe meshes the history of a people with the story of a modern family, laying bare the complexities of desire and family love, religious faith and human frailty.
    The past comes brilliantly alive, beginning with the horrors of the Reformation, when Weynken Claes Wybe is burned at the stake for heretical views on Communion. We are caught up in the great events of each century, as we follow in the footsteps of Adam's forebears: the genius engineer who invented the cable-car system; the artist Enoch Seeman, who found acclamation at the royal court in London after having been forbidden to paint by the Elders; Anna, who endures the great wagon trek across the Volga in 1860, leaving behind her hopes of marriage so that her brothers will escape conscription in the Prussian army; and Elizabeth Katerina, caught in the Red Army's advance into Germany when rape and pillage are the rewards given to soldiers. The title of the novel, taken from a hymn, reflects the beauty and sorrow of these stories of courage. In a startling act of invention, Sweeter Than All the World sets one man's quest for family and love against centuries of turmoil.
    Rudy Wiebe first wrote of Mennonite resettlement in his 1970 epic novel The Blue Mountains of China. Since then, much of his work has focused on re-imagining the history of the Canadian Northwest. In Sweeter Than All the World, as in many of his most acclaimed novels, Wiebe has sought out real historical characters to tell an extraordinary story. William Keith, a University of Toronto professor and author of a book about Wiebe, writes: "Wiebe has a knack for divining wells of human feeling in historical sources." Here, all the main characters share his name, and the history is one to which he belongs. Moreover, alongside those flashbacks into history is revealed an utterly compelling contemporary story of a man whose background is not totally unlike the author's own. Wiebe sets his narrative against his two favourite backdrops: the northern Alberta landscape, and the shared memories of the Mennonite people. Sweeter Than All the World is a compassionate, erudite and stimulating work of fiction that shares the deep-rooted concerns of all of Wiebe's work: how to make history live in our imagination, and how we can best live our lives.

  • Maclean's Editors' Pick: Best Books for Summer Reading
    From the Journey Prize winner Holley Rubinsky comes a collection of linked stories that paints no-nonsense characters with a heartfelt hand. Rubinsky unearths the compulsions that rile ordinary lives, and the dreams and grave losses that haunt them. Set in the fictitious town of Ruth, BC, the cast of these wildly tragi-comic dramas disturb, shock, confound and impress. Some find their lives dusted with hope and redemption; others are not so easily saved.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In Navigating a New World Lloyd Axworthy charts how we can become active citizens in the demanding world of the twenty-first century, to make it safer, more sustainable and more humane. Throughout he emphasizes the human story. As we meet refugees from civil war and drought, child soldiers and landmine victims, the moral imperative is clear: this is a deeply compassionate appeal to confront poverty, war and environmental disaster.
    Before Lloyd Axworthy entered global politics, "human security" -- a philosophy calling for global responsibility to the interests of individuals rather than to the interests of the nation state or multi-national corporations -- was a controversial and unfamiliar idea. When put into action, human security led to an international ban on landmines, initiatives to curtail the use of child soldiers, and the formation of the International Criminal Court. Today, with conflict raging across the planet -- and building -- the need for a humane, secure international governance is more vital than ever. So how can Canada reject a world model dominated by U.S. policy, military force and naked self-interest? How can we rethink a global world from the perspective of people -- our security, our needs, our promise, our dreams?
    Lloyd Axworthy delivers recommendations that are both practical and radical, ranging from staunch Canadian independence from the U.S. to environmental as well as political security; from rules to govern intervention when nations oppress their own citizens, to codes of conduct on arms control and war crimes.
    Arresting and provocative, Navigating a New World lays out just why Canada has the skills to lead the world into a twenty-first century less nightmarish than the last, and help make the world safer and more just for us all. This is a call for action from one of Canada's most eloquent statesmen and thinkers, and is essential reading for all Canadians.
    Where is the line we draw in setting out the boundaries for being responsible for others? Is it simply family and close friends? Do we stop at the frontiers of our own country? Does our conscience, our sense of right or wrong, take us as far as the crowded camps of northern Uganda, surrounded by land mines, attacked repeatedly by an army made largely of child soldiers? I believe we in Canada have a special vocation to help in the building of a more secure order. We need not be confined to our self-interest. -- from Navigating a New World
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Beautiful and meticulously wrought, set in both Toronto and the Caribbean, this astonishing novel gives voice to the power of love and belonging in a story of two women, profoundly different, each in her own spiritual exile.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • In the first ever anthology of its kind, Canada's premier sportswriter -- Globe and Mail columnist and author of the internationally acclaimed bestseller Facing Ali -- brings together the best writing on sport in this country, with a strong contemporary flavour.
    It's all here: classic reports on Canada's great sporting triumphs, from Joe Carter's World Series-winning home run for the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993 to the excitement of the back-to-back men's and women's hockey gold medals in Salt Lake City. Stephen Brunt gives an entire section to writers who, unlike those covering other beats, must work tightly by the clock, submitting their stories just as soon as the action for the day is over. But he has also chosen our best writers' more thoughtful pieces on our national obsessions -- such as Ed Willes on the WHA's seven tumultuous years and Wayne Johnston on the Original Six -- and a good sampling of the great sportswriters such as Trent Frayne, Peter Gzowski and Milt Dunnell. The net effect is an examination of the deep role sport plays in our lives and imaginations, in our sense of self and nationhood.
    Stephen Brunt has cast his net widely. He includes superb stories of lower profile Canadian sports such as wrestling and horse racing, even Monster Truck battles, and allows space for his own unequalled and unforgettable profiles of Muhammad Ali and Mike Tyson, as well as his post-mortem on Ben Johnson's fall from grace.
    Full of triumph and heartbreak, great writing and great passions -- and a few wonderful surprises -- this book will be essential reading for every serious sports fan.
    Including:
    - Ian Brown on the stud-horse business
    - Christie Blatchford on the 2003 Women's Olympic Hockey Gold
    - Rosie DiManno on the Men's
    - James Christie on Ben Johnson's 1988 Olympic triumph in Seoul
    - Michael Faber on Pat Burns
    - Red Fisher on Lemieux and Gretzky at the 1987 Canada Cup
    - Trent Frayne on Canadian Open golf champ Ken Green deciding to play Sun City during apartheid
    - Bruce Grierson on Canada's best squash player
    - Peter Gzowski on the Oilers with Gretzky
    - Tom Hawthorn on John Brophy's last brawl
    - Brian Hutchinson on Owen Hart's widow's revenge
    - Wayne Johnston on the Montreal Canadiens
    - Guy Lawson on curling
    - Allan Maki on the 1989 Hamilton-Saskatchewan Grey Cup
    - Dave Perkins on the biggest home run in World Series history
    - Mordecai Richler on snooker's Cliff Thorburn
    - Steve Simmons on Donovan Bailey
    - Mike Ulmer on Cujo's charm
    and more...
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • "We need to understand our stories because our lives depend upon it." -- Ted Chamberlin
    The stories we tell each other reflect and shape our deepest feelings. Stories help us live our lives -- and are at the heart of our current conflicts. We love and hate because of them; we make homes for ourselves and drive others out on the basis of ancient tales. As Ted Chamberlin vividly reveals, we are both connected by them and separated by their different truths. Whether Jew or Arab, black or white, Muslim or Christian, Catholic or Protestant, man or woman, our stories hold us in thrall and hold others at bay.
    Like the work of Joseph Campbell and Bruce Chatwin, this vital, engrossing book offers a new way to understand the hold that stories and songs have on us, and a new sense of the urgency of doing so. Drawing on his own experience in many fields -- as scholar and storyteller, witness among native peoples and across cultures -- Ted Chamberlin takes us on a journey through the tales of different peoples, from North America to Africa and Jamaica.
    Beautifully written, with insight and deep understanding, If This Is Your Land, Where Are Your Stories? examines why it is now more important than ever to attend to what others are saying in their stories and myths -- and what we are saying about ourselves. Only then will we understand why they have such power over us.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • My Years as Prime Minister is Jean Chrétien's own story, told with insight and humour, of his ten years at 24 Sussex Drive as Canada's twentieth prime minister.
    By the time he left office, Jean Chrétien had been in politics for forty years - and his experience is evident on every page of his important, engaging memoir. Chrétien loves to tell a good tale - and he does so here in the same honest, plain-spoken style of Straight from the Heart, his earlier bestselling account of his years as a Cabinet minister. He gives us a self-portrait of a working prime minister - the passionate Canadian renowned for finishing every speech with Vive le Canada!
    Chrétien knows how government works, and his political instincts are sharp. Through the decade 1993 to 2003 we watch as he wins three majority elections as leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. Finding the country in a dreadful state, dangerously in debt and bitterly divided, he describes how his government wiped out the deficit in just four years, helped to defeat the separatists in the cliffhanger Quebec referendum, passed the Clarity Act, and set out to fulfill the economic and social promises his party made in its famous Red Books. He reveals how and why he kept the country out of the war in Iraq - a defining moment for many Canadians; led Team Canada on whirlwind trade missions around the world; and participated in a host of major international summits.
    Along with his astute comments on politics and government, he gives candid portraits of a broad cast of characters. Over a beer, Tony Blair confides his hesitation about taking Britain into the Iraq War; in the corridors of the United Nations, Bill Clinton offers to speak to Quebecers on behalf of Canadian unity; while at home, Chrétien reveals the events leading up to the departure of his finance minister, Paul Martin. He recounts the dramatic night in which his quick-thinking wife, Aline, saved him from an assassination attempt at 24 Sussex Drive; and, with lively humour, he describes how he and Clinton successfully escaped from their own bodyguards - to the consternation of all.
    Even in the highest office in the land, Jean Chrétien never lost his connection with ordinary Canadians. He is as warm and funny in his recollections as in person, at once combative and cool-headed, a man full of vitality and charm. Above all, from start to finish, his love for his country and his passion to keep it united run clear and deep.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • @20@Doctor Bloom@95@#8217;s Story@21@, a wry and subtle novel, is a Knopf Canada New Face of Fiction selection for 2004 and already a popular and critical favourite. What starts off sounding like a charming, bittersweet memoir develops rapidly into a complex and moving book centred on a pressing moral dilemma.@16@@20@@16@@21@In the first few pages, Dr. Nicolaas Bloom, cardiologist and would-be writer, describes his life@95@#8217;s trajectory: from medical and literary studies in Leiden, Holland, through practice and research in Cambridge to, following the death of his wife, a new life in uptown Toronto. Dr. Bloom@95@#8217;s story proper begins in a writing workshop, taught by his tough-talking neighbour Larry Logan: Bloom finds himself entranced by one of his young classmates, a quiet, self-possessed young woman named Sophie F@95@#252;hr.@16@@16@The novel quickly establishes the rhythm it will pursue throughout, its present-day action in counterpoint with Bloom@95@#8217;s memories and reflections. Bloom works in a downtown medical clinic; he remembers his late wife and stillborn daughter; he considers his literary masters, most of all Chekhov; importantly, he meets Larry Logan@95@#8217;s estranged wife Marianne. Then, out for a run in a local ravine, he sees a woman being beaten up; he has reason to believe it is his classmate, Sophie.@16@@16@As Bloom and Marianne Logan fall for one another, and Bloom tentatively pursues his long postponed writing, Sophie@95@#8217;s situation becomes more and more of a concern; soon it has drawn in Larry, Marianne and others, none of whom are able to step in and help her. This is in part because, complicating matters, Sophie does not appear to want to be @95@#8220;rescued.@95@#8221; As she puts it, speaking of herself in a coded, charged conversation in the writing workshop:@16@@16@@18@@95@#8220;She has a belief. She believes that there are circumstances which, although they may not appear happy, are part of a the deeper life@95@#8230;. it would be a mistake, she thinks, to leave these circumstances.@95@#8221;@16@@19@@16@Sophie@95@#8217;s husband, Walter Rollo Maggione, comes to Bloom for cardiac treatment. Abrasive and arrogant, some twenty-five years older than Sophie, he is a Swiss psychologist pursuing a doctorate at the University of Toronto, specializing in Jung. Meanwhile Marianne, a psychoanalytic psychotherapist, has come to care about Sophie as deeply as Bloom has.@16@@16@Bloom and Marianne return from a brief Caribbean vacation to discover Sophie in the emergency room of Sunnybrook hospital, bruised and battered, claiming to have fallen down the stairs. Her husband has also been admitted, after an attack of angina. Attempts to intervene prove fruitless, but Bloom sees a way he could help Sophie: as Maggione@95@#8217;s physician, he is aware of the subtleties of his condition, aware that were Maggione to not have the right medication to hand at the right moment, his life could be in danger.@16@@16@The novel@95@#8217;s central moral question gains shape: given all he knows about Sophie@95@#8217;s situation @95@#8212; about the violence and suffering she experiences, and her view of it as a kind of religious task @95@#8212; can Bloom justify @95@#8220;altering the odds@95@#8221;? Can he make it less likely that Maggione will pull through his next cardiac malfunction? Bloom@95@#8217;s dilemma, carefully examined and disentangled, will haunt readers of this supple and moving novel long after its resolution.@16@@16@@16@@18@From the Trade Paperback edition.@19@

  • During her decade in prison, Kate Fitzgerald has learned a few things. The best way to survive is to absorb yourself in your own world. Never make eye contact with your fellow inmates. And the last person you can trust is your prison psychiatrist - not only is he likely to be lazy and incompetent (really, why else wouldn't he be getting rich off of well-heeled clients instead?) but if you complain about him you're going to be labelled as a "permanent malcontent" and denied parole. So when Dr. Gardonne offers Kate a temporary absence and a job working for him, she only takes it because she knows that turning him down could be worse for her in the long run - counted in prison years, of course. But the real challenge is figuring out why he would choose her.
    On the surface, it's pretty clear. Kate has spent her incarceration immersing herself in the writings of Sigmund Freud, and has become a recognized expert on his work. Dr. Gardonne represents the members of a psychoanalytic organization that is being attacked at its core: Anders Konzak, the hand-picked director of the Freud academy, has been boasting to the media that his new research on Freud will bring the entire profession of psychoanalysis to its knees. He's also been receiving death threats. And Kate, as an outsider, is the only one Konzak will talk to. Though she doesn't trust Gardonne, Kate accepts his offer, and she races to uncover Konzak's secrets before he publishes his work.
    Never one to work well with others, Kate is less than thrilled to find out Gardonne has hired a private detective to be her partner. Jackie Lawton is a hardened ex-con who has spent most of his life in prison and only recently turned things around by starting his own business. From the moment the two meet, Kate sees that it won't be easy working with a man who isn't really interested in the intellectual battle at hand and who keeps her prison time at the forefront of every conversation. And can he really be trusted? When key players - who were all last seen with Kate - begin to turn up dead, there's the very real possibility she's being set up by Gardonne. After all, who would believe the word of a convict serving time for murdering her husband? All she can hope is that following the threads of Konzak's research to his sources will keep her one step ahead of Gardonne and lead her to the real killer.
    With Seduction, Catherine Gildiner gives us not only a gripping detective story full of shifting characters and fast-paced twists but a remarkable intellectual thriller. Through the letters and papers of Sigmund Freud, Charles Darwin and the venerable Wedgwood family, Gildiner brings the personalities and ideological conflicts of the past to life in the present. Along the way we meet an assortment of characters, from social misfits to the demure but resolute Anna Freud, who is still living in the London house where she brought her ailing father for the last year of his life, and where she actively guards his legacy. The story takes us from Toronto to Vienna, London, the Isle of Wight, New York and back again to Toronto - each locale seen through the eyes of Kate, who relishes in the beauty of a world that has been denied to her for a decade.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • These eight tales of survival and triumph, suffused with magical realism, bring to life the harsh struggles, the dreams, the greed, the obsessions, the xenophobia -- and the love -- experienced by the trappers and prospectors who flocked to northern Ontario during the Porcupine Gold Rush (1900 - 1922).
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Joan Clark’s An Audience of Chairs opens with Moranna MacKenzie living alone in her ancestral Cape Breton farmhouse, waging a war with the symptoms of bipolar disorder and grieving the loss of her two daughters, taken from her over thirty years previously. There are few people remaining in her life, as Moranna cannot help but tax the patience of nearly everyone she encounters. Her long-suffering brother Murdoch has her best interests at heart, though he is fatigued by her enormous needs and pressured by his ambitious wife to invest less time in her. Pastor Andy politely sloughs off the peculiarly intelligent yet unpalatable sermons Moranna pens for him. Her neighbour Lottie knows what it is to be an eccentric and can be counted on to come through in a pinch. The local RCMP constabulary smooths over her legal scrapes. And her lover Bun, who lives with her when not working on the ferries between Cape Breton and Newfoundland, knows how to give her a wide berth on her “foul weather” days. Thanks to the assistance of these sometimes reluctant guardian angels, as well as to the carefully planned inheritance left by her father (not to mention her own sheer ingenuity), Moranna has managed to get by all these years despite small-town gossips and tormenting youths.
    Through a series of flashbacks, we learn more about the devastating effects of Moranna’ s mental illness on her life and that of her family. But An Audience of Chairs also gives us a glimpse into the mind of a true iconoclast and wild spirit, who has managed despite overwhelming odds to keep hope alive.
    Of An Audience of Chairs, Quill and Quire said: “Elegantly written and deeply grounded in place, this moving, compassionate novel is far more than a story of mental illness. Moranna’s quest is for peace, joy, and connection–the same yearnings that drive us all.”

  • Anglais You Never Know

    Isabel Huggan

    You Never Know is the new collection of stories from Isabel Huggan, author of The Elizabeth Stories. Set in Canada, Kenya and France, the tales deal with the friendship of young girls, mother-daughter relationships and unresolved feelings between men and women.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Susan Musgrave's bestselling third novel, Cargo of Orchids, examines the life of a woman on death row in the United States. Our narrator recalls what brought her to this place, where she awaits the last of her appeals. We learn that along with her cellmates, Frenchy and Rainy, this Mother Without a Heart, otherwise known as the Cocaine Queen, has been sentenced to death for the crime of killing her child.
    Unlike the others, the narrator has not had a life marked by abuse and hardship. When her story begins, she is translating a book about the kidnapping of a woman connected to a drug cartel. At the book launch, she meets her husband-to-be, a lawyer. When their marriage fizzles out, she falls in love with one of his clients, Angel, a Colombian from a drug cartel family, imprisoned in British Columbia on a drug-smuggling charge. Pregnant, the narrator is taken hostage by Angel's wife to a hot and squalid island off the coast of Colombia; in an atmosphere of extreme violence, she is fed drugs until she becomes addicted to cocaine and useless to her child. When she winds up on death row, it is because the evidence in her trial suggests she sacrificed her baby for drugs.
    Her narrative - violent and bizarre, but also riveting and erotic - runs parallel to an account of life in "Death Clinic" at the Heaven Valley State Facility for Women. A moving story emerges of the friendship of three female inmates who share only the fact that they each have a date with the executioner. There is humour and emotion in their lives, however harsh their stories. When Musgrave was asked how humour finds its way into such an unlikely place, she replied, "It's a survival technique. People make jokes when they survive tragedies - that's how they deal with the world."
    In this novel about prison and drug culture, filled with brutality and injustices, the compassion we feel for the narrator lends the story a moral message: that nobody is so simply bad as to deserve the death sentence. As the Gazette commented, the book puts "a human face on convicted criminals," makes us face squarely the issue of capital punishment and assess how we judge guilt, innocence and the ambiguous space in between. The Calgary Straight called the book "a love letter to those who are serving time and the families who serve with them." It's also a book about unconditional love and how far we will go for it, according to Musgrave, who spent eight years writing this novel and knows plenty about prison life, having met and married her husband Stephen Reid during his incarceration in the 1980s. She had just finished a draft of the novel when Reid was arrested again following a bank robbery in 1999, just months after the CBC aired a Life and Times documentary about the couple.
    A brilliant mix of black humour, stark tragedy and poignant humanity, Cargo of Orchids is Musgrave's first novel in over ten years. She has three times been nominated for the Governor General's Award, once for fiction (The Charcoal Burners) and twice for poetry (A Man to Marry, a Man to Bury and Grave-Dirt and Selected Strawberries), and has published over twenty books. She likes novels with intense use of language and good plotting. "I want to give readers a harrowing ride," she says. "I like to think of Cargo of Orchids as a suspense novel which is also an exploration of the heart."
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Silent Cruise

    Timothy Taylor

    From the author of the bestselling novel, Stanley Park, a dazzling collection of short fiction to debut in our new Vintage Tales series. Taylor, whose writing possesses an astonishing range and depth, first came to national attention with his short story writing. This collection includes, among others, his Journey Prize-winning story, "Doves of Townsend," for which he also won a Silver National Magazine Award, and two other stories from the fall 2000 Journey Prize Anthology.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

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