National Geographic Society Digital

  • Eric H. Cline uses the tools of his trade to examine some of the most puzzling mysteries from the Hebrew Bible and, in the process, to narrate the history of ancient Israel. Combining the academic rigor that has won the respect of his peers with an accessible style that has made him a favorite with readers and students alike, he lays out each mystery, evaluates all available evidence from established fact to arguable assumption to far-fetched leap of faith and proposes an explanation that reconciles Scripture, science, and history.
    Numerous amateur archaeologists have sought some trace of NoahÕs Ark to meet only with failure. But, though no serious scholar would undertake such a literal search, many agree that the Flood was no myth but the cultural memory of a real, catastrophic inundation, retold and reshaped over countless generations. Likewise, some experts suggest that JoshuaÕs storied victory at Jericho is the distant echo of an earthquake instead of IsraelÕs sacred trumpets a fascinating, geologically plausible theory that remains unproven despite the best efforts of scientific research.
    Cline places these and other Biblical stories in solid archaeological and historical context, debunks more than a few lunatic-fringe fantasies, and reserves judgment on ideas that cannot yet be confirmed or denied. Along the way, our most informed understanding of ancient Israel comes alive with dramatic but accurate detail in this groundbreaking, engrossig, entertaining book by one of the rising stars in the field.

  • "The division between conventional and traditional medicine is as artificial as the division between science and nature. They can be woven together in a fashion that meets our physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. This is the foundation upon which integrative medicine is built." -- Tieraona Low Dog, M.D.
    In Life Is Your Best Medicine, Dr. Low Dog weaves together the wisdom of traditional medicine and the knowledge of modern-day medicine into an elegant message of health and self-affirmation for women of every age. This is a book that can be read cover to cover but also dipped into for inspiration or insight about a particular physical or mental health issue or remedy. We learn that, despite the widespread availability of pharmaceutical medications, advanced surgical care, and state-of-the-art medical technology, chronic illness now affects more than 50% of the American population. The evidence is overwhelmingly clear that much of the chronic disease we are confronting in the United States has its roots in the way we live our lives. Research shows that if Americans embraced a healthier lifestyle, which includes a balance between rest and exercise; wholesome nutrition; healthy weight; positive social interactions; stress management; not smoking; limited alcohol use; and no or limited exposure to toxic chemicals; then 93% of diabetes, 81% of heart attacks, 50% of strokes, and 36% of all cancers could be prevented! This means that each one of us has the power to shift the odds of being healthy in our favor. And if you do get sick, being fit gives you a much better chance for getting well. Your health has a great deal more to do with your lifestyle and a lot less to do with taking prescription drugs than most people realize.
    Part I. The Medicine of My Life is a personal and passionate introduction to the book Part II. Honoring the Body includes Food, Supplements, Illness, Wholeness Part III. Awakening the Senses includes Nature, Garden, Music Part IV. Listening to Spirit includes Humor, Relationships, Play, Meditation, Animals Epilogue. Contentment

  • What real-life character inspired Bram Stokers classic Dracula? Did a blood-sucking demon haunt ancient Mespotamia? Did 16th century Venetians drive a stake through the heart of a true vampire, or was something more sinister at work?
    For thousands of years vampires have both terrified and titillated our imaginations. Today vampires pervade our popular culture in books, films, and TV shows, and recent discoveries are shedding new light on the origins of vampire myth and legend. This fascinating history, written in conjunction with leading experts in science, anthropology, and archaeology, explores the myriad origins of 8 fascinating vampire stories, providing gripping historic and folkloric context for the concept of beings who seemingly defied death and fed on the lifeblood of others. From ancient whispers in Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome, legends of vampiric demons passed through the centuries and around the globe, fed by misconceptions about the afterlife, fear of disease, and the unshakable feeling that demons might dwell among us.
    In True Tales of Vampires, Mark Jenkins will revisit some of the touch points of vampire legend to base his tale in the historical record: shards of Persian pottery depicting blood-sucking demons; the amazing recent discovery by National Geographic archaeologist Matteo Borrini of a 16th century Venetian grave of a plague victim and suspected vampire, buried with a brick through its mouth to prevent itterrorizing the living; the Salem-witch-trial-like epidemic of vampire stakings in 18th century Germany that challenged notions of Europes so-called Age of Enlightenment; and the castle of Transylvanian count Vlad the Impaler, whose bloodthirsty methods added a new dimension to the vampire story.
    The term vampire itself made its way to Europe in the 18th century, arising out of Slavic and other eastern European traditions. In 1897 Bram Stokers Dracula solidified the concept of a coffin-dwelling, bloodthirsty undead human. Today, the vampire myth is stronger than ever, and continues to fascinate the living. In Vampire Forensics Jenkins works with noted experts in the fields of archaeology, forensics, and anthropology to skillfully navigate centuries of myth and legend, adding new chapters to the vampire story and weaving spine-tingling tales along the way.
    Jenkins long-form book about vampires, Vampire Forensics, was dubbed a A lively and entertaining survey of the historical and scientific materials relating to the natural phenomena that earlier centuries relentlessly misinterpreted as evidence for the undead" by The Washington Post.

  • After more than 9 seasons as TVs Dog Whisperer, Cesar Millan has a new mission: to use his unique insights about dog psychology to create stronger, happier relationships between humans and their canine companions.
    Now in paperback, this inspirational and practical guide draws on thousands of training encounters around the world to present 98 essential lessons. Taken together, they will help dog owners create the most fulfilling life possible with their dogs.
    In these pages, Cesar delves into crucial themes that go beyond obedience-school basics to reveal the hearts and minds of our beloved pets. In short, practical takes, he explores:
    The basics of dog psychology Instinctual behaviors Creating balance and boundaries Managing common misbehaviors Choosing the right dog for your family Helping your dog adjust to life transitions Throughout the book, inspiring stories from Cesars case files -- and from his TV show, Leader of the Pack provide moving real-world applications and surprising life lessons.
    Smart, easy to use, and packed with Cesar's remarkable insights into human and canine behavior, A Short Guide to A Happy Dog is an inspiring tool for anyone looking to live a better life with a beloved member of the family.

  • Charles Darwins theory of evolution and natural selection has been debated and disparaged over time, but there is no dispute that he is responsible for some of the most remarkable and groundbreaking scientific findings in history. His five-year trip as a naturalist on the H.M.S. Beagletook him on a journey to such exotic locales as Chile, Argentina, and the Galapagos Islands. Darwin wrote the details of this expedition, including his thoughts about the people on the ship and of course, his observations of the flora and fauna, in his journal, published as Voyage of the Beagle. It is here that his original interpretations of the Galapagos ecosystem and the impact of nature and selection are first revealed.
    This edition of the classic travel memoir is enhanced with an introduction by bestselling nature writer David Quammen, and is part of National Geographics major cross-platform event in spring 2009 to celebrate the anniversary.

  • Its a poignant irony in American history that on Independence Day, 1863, not one but two pivotal Civil War battles ended in Union victory, marked the high tide of Confederate military fortune, and ultimately doomed the Souths effort at secession. But on July 4, 1863, after six months of siege, Ulysses Grants Union army finally took Vicksburg and the Confederate west.
    On the very same day, Robert E. Lee was in Pennsylvania, parrying the threat to Vicksburg with a daring push north to Gettysburg. For two days the battle had raged; on the next, July 4, 1863, Picketts Charge was thrown back, a magnificently brave but fruitless assault, and the fate of the Confederacy was sealed, though nearly two more years of bitter fighting remained until the war came to an end.
    In Receding Tide, Edwin Cole Bearss draws from his popular Civil War battlefield tours to chronicle these two widely separated but simultaneous clashes and their dramatic conclusion. As the recognized expert on both Vicksburg and Gettysburg, Bearss tells the fascinating story of this single momentous day in our countrys history, offering his readers narratives, maps, illustrations, characteristic wit, dramatic new insights and unerringly intimate knowledge of terrain, tactics, and the colorful personalities of Americas citizen soldiers, Northern and Southern alike.

  • Marketing experts predict that by 2009, nearly 90% of all cell phones will contain a camera, as manufacturers race to create cheaper, easiertouse models with more sophisticated cameras, more pixels, flash units and even multiple lenses. Already revolutionizing audiovisual communication, it's a trend that will only grow more explosively—and who better than National Geographic to create a howto book aimed directly at the millions who carry a camera phone everywhere and want to make the most of it?Created by two top professionals, this generously illustrated nutsandbolts guide is the first of its kind to treat these units as genuine cameras instead of novelties, and the only one to include a fullcolor photoessay demonstrating the full capabilities of the latest camera phones. In five easytoread chapters, the book explains how to choose good equipment; take better pictures; and store, print and send the best images. Readers will find practical tips on preventing or repairing water damage, protecting easilyscratched lenses inside pockets and purses, and retrieving accidentallyerased images. They'll also learn to access the events, advice, and opportunities of the burgeoning camera phone community, from film festivals to news organizations, moblogs, and more.Featuring the technical savvy of CNet.com's Aimee Baldridge and the creative skill of National Geographic photographer Robert Clark, a camera phone pioneer, this compact yet comprehensive referenc combines uptotheminute expertise with superb examples, at an inexpensive price that makes it a perfect gift book—or an ideal impulse buy.

  • It';s been nearly four decades since scientists first realized that global warming posed a potential threat to our planet. Why, if we knew of the threats way back in the Carter Administration, can';t we act decisively to limit greenhouse gases, deforestation, and catastrophic warming trends? Why are we still addicted to fossil fuels? Have we all just been fiddling for 40 years as the world burns around us?
    Schneider, part of the Nobel Prize-winning team that shared the accolade with Al Gore in 2007, had a front-row seat at this unfolding environmental meltdown. Piecing together events like a detective story, Schneider reveals that as expert consensus grew, well-informed activists warned of dangerous changes no one knew how to predict precisely--and special interests seized on that very uncertainty to block any effective response. He persuasively outlines a plan to avert the building threat and develop a positive, practical policy that will bring climate change back under our control, help the economy with a new generation of green energy jobs and productivity, and reduce the dependence on unreliable exporters of oil--and thus ensure a future for ourselves and our planet that';s as rich with promise as our past.

  • Judas Iscariot.He’s been hated and reviled through the ages as Jesus Christ’s betrayer– the close friend who sells him out for 30 pieces of silver.But history also records other information about Judas Iscariot. One such reference was written in 180 by an influential Church Father named St. Irenaeus who railed against the Gospel of Judas for depicting the last days of Jesus from the perspective of the disgraced apostle. In its pages, Judas is Christ’s favorite. It’s a startlingly different story than the one handed down through the ages. Once it was denounced as heresy, the Gospel of Judas faded from sight. It became one of history’s forgotten manuscripts. Until now.In this compelling and exhaustively researched account, Herbert Krosney unravels how the Gospel of Judas was found and its meaning painstakingly teased from the ancient Coptic script that had hid its message for centuries. With all the skills of an investigative journalist and master storyteller, Krosney traces the forgotten gospel’s improbable journey across three continents, a trek that would take it through the netherworld of the international antiquities trade, until the crumbling papyrus is finally made to give up its secrets. The race to discover the Gospel of Judas will go down as one of the great detective stories of biblical archaeology.

  • In 1915, the United States experienced the 9/11 of its time. A German torpedo sank the Lusitania killing nearly 2,000 innocent passengers. The ensuing hysteria helped draw the United States into World War I--the bitter, brutal conflict that became known as the Great War and the War to End All Wars. But as U.S. troops fought to make the world safe for democracy abroad, our own government eroded freedoms at home, especially for German-Americans. Free speech was no longer an operating principle of American democracy. Award-winning author Ann Bausum asks, just where do Americans draw the line of justice in times of war?
    Drawing thought-provoking parallels with President Wilson';s government and other wartime administrations, from FDR to George W. Bush, Bausum';s analysis has plenty of history lessons for the world today. Her exhaustive research turns up astonishing first-person stories and rare images, and the full-color design is fresh and stunning. The result is a gripping book that is well-positioned for the run-up to the World War I centennial.

  • Donovan Webster brings his vivid journalistic gifts to a new subject, tracing our deep genealogy using cutting-edge DNA research to map our eons-old journey from prehistoric Africa into the modern world. With the same genetic haplotype as many white American males, Webster makes an ideal subject--he is a genuine Everyman. While his voice and spirit are unique to him, in exploring his own ancestry, he shows us our own.
    Drawing on National Geographics Genographic Project, the largest anthropologic DNA study of its kind, Webster traces centuries of migrations, everywhere finding members of his now far-flung genetic family. In Tanzanias Rift Valley, he hunts with Julius, whose tribe speaks a click language, and wanders the ruins of ancient Mesopotamia with Mohamed and Khalid, now Jordanian citizens. In Samarkand, Uzbekistan, eastern frontier of his ancestral roaming, a circus ringmaster becomes both friend and link to his primal bloodline.
    Websters genographic quest leads him to contemplate what traits he shares with those he meets, and considers what they and their ways of life reveal about the deep history of our species. A lifetime of journalistic travels among a wide range of cultures furnish Webster with a wealth of colorful threads to weave into a story as particularly personal as it is universally human.

  • Thomas Jefferson has inspired countless books that explore his brilliant career, his political philosophy, and his extraordinary accomplishments as a gifted leader. Endlessly inquisitive, he was both a tireless writer and one of the most cosmopolitan men of his age. Yet this collection of Jefferson's reflections on his wideranging travels reveals a new side of the man. Eloquent and powerful, Thomas Jefferson's letters and travel diaries from his years abroad as the U.S. minister to France spill onto the pages of this volume in wonderful detail, covering the full range of his interests and passions. Editor Anthony Brandt has sifted through the myriad of writings from this rich period of Jefferson's career to present not only the politician and diplomat but Thomas Jefferson the lover, the father, the farmer, the architect, the man about town, the scientist, the visionary. Jefferson emerges at the end a fully dimensional man, with all his virtues, his flaws, and his extraordinary brilliance fleshed out, standing vividly before us. Thomas Jefferson formulated many of America's highest ideals. Here we see the man himself, and glimpse the world through his eyes.

  • 1898, Tsavo River Kenya, the British Empire has employed 140 workers to build a railroad bridge. The bridge's construction comes to a violent halt when two maneless lions devour all 140 workers in a savage feeding frenzy that would make headlinesand history--all over the world. Caputo's Ghosts of Tsavo is a new quest for truth about the origins of these near-mythical animals and how they became predators of human flesh.

  • The author offers a tour of the English capital and its literary significance, tracking the footsteps of some of her favorite fictional characters throughout London.

  • Following in the paw prints of the successful first DogTown book, companion to the hit show on the National Geographic Channel, Dog Tips from Dogtown is the pet owner's practical guide to building a healthy, happy relationship with a dog. Relying on the unparalleled expertise of the trainers at the Best Friends Animal Society, this manual shows, with step-by-step illustrations, how to apply the power of positive reinforcement to train a pet. From adoption tips to canine communication lessons and training strategies that make a regimen fun for everyone, Dog Tips from DogTown is a complete guide to the tried and true methods that work miracles every day at the Best Friends Animal Society.

  • Looks at the history of the Paris neighborhood of St.-Germain and its many notable inhabitants and haunts.

  • Alive in the Killing Fields is the real-life memoir of Nawuth Keat, a man who survived the horrors of war-torn Cambodia. He has now broken a longtime silence in the hope that telling the truth about what happened to his people and his country will spare future generations from similar tragedy.
    In this captivating memoir, a young Nawuth defies the odds and survives the invasion of his homeland by the Khmer Rouge. Under the brutal reign of the dictator Pol Pot, he loses his parents, young sister, and other members of his family. After his hometown of Salatrave was overrun, Nawuth and his remaining relatives are eventually captured and enslaved by Khmer Rouge fighters. They endure physical abuse, hunger, and inhumane living conditions. But through it all, their sense of family holds them together, giving them the strength to persevere through a time when any assertion of identity is punishable by death.
    Nawuth';s story of survival and escape from the Killing Fields of Cambodia is also a message of hope; an inspiration to children whose worlds have been darkened by hardship and separation from loved ones. This story provides a timeless lesson in the value of human dignity and freedom for readers of all ages.

  • When Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon in 1969, they personified an almost unimaginable feat—the incredibly complex task of sending humans safely to another celestial body. This extraordinary odyssey, which grew from the rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War, was galvanized by the Sputnik launch in 1957. To mark the fiftieth anniversary of Sputnik, National Geographic recaptures this gripping moment in the human experience with a lively and compelling new account. Written by Smithsonian curator Von Hardesty and researcher Gene Eisman, Epic Rivalry tells the story from both the American and the Russian points of view, and shows how each spacefaring nation played a vital role in stimulating the work of the other. Scores of rare, unpublished, and powerful photographs recall the urgency and technical creativity of both nations' efforts. The authors recreate in vivid detail the "parallel universes" of the two space exploration programs, with visionaries Wernher von Braun and Sergei Korolev and political leaders John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev at the epicenters. The conflict between countries, and the tense drama of their independent progress, unfolds in vivid prose. Approaching its subject from a uniquely balanced perspective, this important new narrative chronicles the epic race to the moon and back as it has never been told before—and captures the interest of casual browsers and science, space,and history enthusiasts alike.

  • No nation on Earth is as newsworthy as 21st-century Chinayes'>#151;and no book could be timelier than Dragon Rising, as world attention focuses on China's all-out effort to present itself as a modern world power and on the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Becker is the ideal guide to the profound changes within China that are reshaping global economic, diplomatic, and military strategies. He weaves analysis with anecdotes to address today's pressing uncertainties: How will China cope with pollution, unemployment, and demand for energy? What form will its government take? Can Shanghai's success with urban capitalism be replicated elsewhere? Each chapter focuses on a specific region and its local issuesyes'>#151;minority unrest, poverty, corruptionyes'>#151;then places them in the broader context of China society as a whole. Vividly illustrated with photographs that capture the paradox of an ancient culture remaking itself into a dynamic consumer society, Dragon Rising is a wonderfully written, well-rounded, wide-ranging portrait of China's problems and prospects.

  • The Spies of Mississippi is a compelling story of how state spies tried to block voting rights for African Americans during the Civil Rights era. This book sheds new light on one of the most momentous periods in American history.
    Author Rick Bowers has combed through primary-source materials and interviewed surviving activists named in once-secret files, as well as the writings and oral histories of Mississippi civil rights leaders. Readers get first-hand accounts of how neighbors spied on neighbors, teachers spied on students, ministers spied on church-goers, and spies even spied on spies.
    The Spies of Mississippi will inspire readers with the stories of the brave citizens who overcame the forces of white supremacy to usher in a new era of hope and freedom--an age that has recently culminated in the election of Barack Obama

  • Travel backward through time from today's scattered billions to the handful of early humans who lived in Africa 60,000 years ago and are ancestors to us all. In Deep Ancestry, scientist and National Geographic explorer Spencer Wells shows how tiny genetic changes add up over time into a fascinating story. Using scores of reallife examples, helpful analogies, and detailed diagrams and illustrations, he explains exactly how each and every individual's DNA contributes another piece to the jigsaw puzzle of human history. The book takes readers inside the Genographic Project—the landmark study now assembling the world's largest collection of DNA samples and employing the latest in testing technology and computer analysis to examine hundreds of thousand of genetic profiles from all over the globe—and invites us all to take part.

  • One of thousands of children who fled strife in southern Sudan, John Bul Dau survived hunger, exhaustion, and violence. His wife, Martha, endured similar hardships. In this memorable book, the two convey the best of African values while relating searing accounts of famine and war. There';s warmth as well, in their humorous tales of adapting to American life. For its importance as a primary source, for its inclusion of the rarely told female perspective of Sudan';s lost children, for its celebration of human resilience, this is the perfect story to inform and inspire young readers.

  • Women’s travel is a thriving niche, as our first book by travel expert Marybeth Bond amply showed. To continue serving that eager market of traveling women, National Geographic presents Best Girlfriends Getaways Worldwide.Each chapter takes off with stories of women who traveled with girlfriends to celebrate, grow, challenge themselves, or simply enjoy every moment to its fullest. They ran marathons to support favorite causes, cycled through Ireland, volunteered in Montana, overnighted at a French chateau. One woman recounts how she broke through her culinary comfort zone, telling behindthescenes stories of a weeklong cooking class in Tuscany. An altruistic adventurer describes her lifeaffirming volunteer vacation with a close friend, delivering books to schools in rural Nepal. The informationpacked chapters suggest onceinalifetime exotic escapes, trips to the world’s best cities, cultural hot spots, places to learn and stretch your mind, canal and river trips, and great culinary getaways. Each concludes with a targeted howto section featuring websites and contact information to help readers set off on their own adventures.Female baby boomers are not going quietly over the hill—they are roaring along the roads, waterways, and paths with style and humor. This is the book to guide them.

  • "Lost Boy" John Bul Dau's harrowing experience surviving the brutal horrors of Sudanese civil war and his adjustment to life in modern America is chronicled in this inspiring memoir and featured in an award-winning documentary film of the same name. Movingly written, the book traces Dau's journey through hunger, exhaustion, terror, and violence as he fled his homeland, dodging ambushes, massacres and attacks by wild animals. His tortuous, 14-year journey began in 1987, when he was just 13, and took him on a 1,000-mile walk, barefoot, to Ethiopia, back to Sudan, then to a refugee camp in Kenya, where he lived with thousands of other Lost Boys. In 2001, at the age of 27, he immigrated to the United States. With touching humor, Dau recounts the shock of his tribal culture colliding with life in America. He shares the joy of reuniting with his family and the challenges of making a new life for himself while never forgetting the other Lost Boys he left behind.

empty