Anne Cheng

  • Histoire de la pensée chinoise Depuis quatre mille ans, la culture chinoise offre l'image d'une remarquable continuité. Pourtant, c'est à travers une histoire faite de ruptures, de mutations mais aussi d'échanges, que la Chine a vu naître des pensées aussi originales que celles de Confucius et du taoïsme, assimilé le bouddhisme et engagé à l'ère moderne un dialogue, décisif, avec l'Occident.

    Anne Cheng nous donne de cette tradition intellectuelle une synthèse magistrale. L'évolution de la pensée chinoise est ici retracée depuis la dynastie des Shang au deuxième millénaire avant notre ère jusqu'au mouvement du 4 mai 1919, qui marque à la fois la rupture avec le passé et le renouveau d'une pensée qui n'a pas dit son dernier mot.
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    Anne Cheng Titulaire de la chaire « Histoire intellectuelle de la Chine » au Collège de France, elle est notamment l'auteur d'une traduction des Entretiens de Confucius (Seuil, « Points Sagesses », 1981) qui fait autorité.



    Prix Stanislas-Julien et Dagnan-Bouveret de l'Académie française

  • Since the Age of Enlightenment in Europe, much scholarly work has been done on "thinking China". A result has been the most contradictory representations which attempt to reconcile "philosophical China" with "Oriental despotism", or an eternal aesthetic and consensual China with a more unpredictable and disturbing vision of the country. To break free of these tenacious clichés, Anne Cheng proposes that we listen carefully to what Chinese authors actually have to say. After all, is China not herself able to think and conceive of her own reality?

  • Leçon inaugurale prononcée le jeudi 11 décembre 2008. Chaire d´Histoire intellectuelle de la Chine. Depuis l´Europe des Lumières, on s´est beaucoup occupé de « penser la Chine », quitte à fabriquer les représentations les plus contradictoires, entre la « Chine philosophique » et le « despotisme oriental », entre une Chine éternelle, esthétique et consensuelle, et une autre, imprévisible et inquiétante. Pour sortir de ces clichés tenaces, Anne Cheng nous propose d´exercer notre oreille à capter ce que les auteurs chinois nous donnent à entendre. La Chine ne serait-elle pas capable, après tout, de penser et de se penser par elle-même ?

  • Through the figure of Josephine Baker, Second Skin tells the story of an unexpected yet enduring intimacy between the invention of a modernist style and the theatricalization of black skin at the turn of the twentieth century. Stepping outside of the platitudes surrounding this iconic figure, Anne A. Cheng argues that Baker's famous nakedness must be understood within larger philosophic and aesthetic debates about, and desire for, 'pure surface' that crystallized at the convergence of modern art, architecture, machinery, and philosophy. Through Cheng's analysis, Baker emerges as a central artist whose work engages with and impacts various modes of modernist display such as film, photography, art, and even the modern house.

  • In this groundbreaking, interdisciplinary study Anne Anlin Cheng argues that we have to understand racial grief not only as the result of racism but also as a foundation for racial identity. The Melancholy of Race proposes that racial identification is itself already a melancholic act--a social category that is imaginatively supported through a dynamic of loss and compensation, by which the racial other is at once rejected and retained. Using psychoanalytic theories on mourning and melancholia as inroads into her subject, Cheng offers a closely observed and carefully reasoned account of the minority experience as expressed in works of art by, and about, Asian-Americans and African-Americans. She argues that the racial minority and dominant American culture both suffer from racial melancholia and that this insight is crucial to a productive reimagining of progressive politics. Her discussion ranges from Flower Drum Song to M. Butterfly, Brown v. Board of Education to Anna Deavere Smith's Twilight, and Invisible Man to The Woman Warrior, in the process demonstrating that racial melancholia permeates our fantasies of citizenship, assimilation, and social health. Her investigations reveal the common interests that social, legal, and literary histories of race have always shared with psychoanalysis, and situates Asian-American and African-American identities in relation to one another within the larger process of American racialization. A provocative look at a timely subject, this study is essential reading for anyone interested in race studies, critical theory, or psychoanalysis.

  • Through the figure of Josephine Baker, Second Skin tells the story of an unexpected yet enduring intimacy between the invention of a modernist style and the theatricalization of black skin at the turn of the twentieth century. Stepping outside of the platitudes surrounding this iconic figure, Anne A. Cheng argues that Baker's famous nakedness must be understood within larger philosophic and aesthetic debates about, and desire for, 'pure surface' that crystallized at the convergence of modern art, architecture, machinery, and philosophy. Through Cheng's analysis, Baker emerges as a central artist whose work engages with and impacts various modes of modernist display such as film, photography, art, and even the modern house.

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