John Barrow

  • In The Artful Universe (OUP, 1995) John D. Barrow explored the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe, challenging the commonly held view that our sense of beauty is entirely free and unfettered. It looked at some of the unexpected ways in which the structure of the Universe, its laws, its environments, and above all its underlying mathematical structure imprints itself on our thoughts, our aesthetic preferences, and our views about the nature of things. The exploration embraced topics such as perspective; the size of things and the origins of aesthetics; computer art (posing the question: is it art?); and the origins of our susceptibility to music. Life sales of the hardback totalled just over 25,000 copies.

    The study of the evolutionary and mathematical underpinnings of our aesthetic sense, and our understanding of the nature and scale of the universe has grown over the past decade, with developments in evolutionary psychology, and in cosmology. This paperback of the revised edition (OUP, 2005) contains eight new sections covering the recent discoveries of extrasolar planets, fashionable postmodernist rejection of science as uncovering objective reality, growing understanding of key ratios appearing in biological relationships, and studies of the underlying mathematical structure of a Pollock painting.

  • Immersion dans la Chine de la fin de Temps Modernes et de l'époque pré-industrielle.
    17ème et 18ème siècle, l'Europe découvre la Chine. Avec les écrits de John Barrow (VOYAGE EN CHINE, 1792) et d'Athanase Kirchere (LA CHINE, 1670).
    Deux récits de voyages d'occidentaux à la découverte de la Chine dans une époque en pleine mutation.
    EXTRAIT
    Puisque nos aïeuls ont toujours fait tant d'estime de la science astrologique, elle mérite bien que nous en fassions le même à leur exemple, & que nous l'élevions encore par dessus les astres, d'autant qu'ayant été presque mise en oubli sous le règne des autres empereurs, elle a été rétablie à présent dans sa première perfection, particulièrement du temps de Suen empereur tartare, qui possédait cet empire chinois avant l'année 400, sous le règne duquel elle fut rendue plus exacte par Coxeu Kim ; comme elle fut néanmoins remplie de si grandes erreurs sur la fin de la vie de notre prédécesseur qu'on nommait Mim, qu'il était impossible de s'en pouvoir servir, le bonheur a voulu que nous avons trouvé Jean Adam Schal, qui est venu des extrémités de l'Occident dans la Chine, & qui sait non seulement l'art de calculer, mais encore possède parfaitement la théorie des planètes, & tout ce qui appartient à l'astrologie, lequel a mis cette science en lumière, & a mérité que notre prédécesseur, en ayant eu connaissance, l'ait envoyé chercher, pour l'établir maître de l'académie des Mathématiques, & lui ait donné la charge de perfectionner la science astrologique.
    À PROPOS DE L'AUTEUR
    Sir John Barrow, né le 19 juin 1764 dans le hameau de Dragley Beck, dans la paroisse d'Ulverston dans le Lancashire et mort le 23 novembre 1848, est un explorateur et administrateur britannique.
    Athanasius Kircher (en français : Athanase Kircher) (2 mai 1602, Geisa, en Thuringe, près de Fulda, en Allemagne - 27 novembre 1680, Rome, Italie) est un jésuite allemand, graphologue, orientaliste, esprit encyclopédique et un des scientifiques les plus importants de l'époque baroque.

  • L'aventure du Bounty Nouv.

    Cet ouvrage est une réédition numérique d'un livre paru au XXe siècle, désormais indisponible dans son format d'origine.

  • 'If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is.' John von Neumann Mathematics can tell you things about the world that can't be learned in any other way. This hugely informative and wonderfully entertaining little book answers one hundred essential questions about existence. It unravels the knotty, clarifies the conundrums and sheds light into dark corners. From winning the lottery, placing bets at the races and escaping from bears to sports, Shakepeare, Google, game theory, drunks, divorce settlements and dodgy accounting; from chaos to infinity and everything in between, 100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know has all the answers!

  • Anglais Cosmic Imagery

    John D Barrow

    * Certain key images embody our understanding of life and the universe we inhabit. Some, like Robert Hooke's first microscopic views of the natural world, or the stunning images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, were made possible by our new technical capabilities.

    * Others, like the first graph, were breathtakingly simple but perennially useful. Vesalius's haunting pictures of the human anatomy were nothing less than works of art, while the simple diagram now known as Pythagoras' Theorem - proved by the ancient Babylonians, Chinese, Indians and Egyptians long before the Greeks themselves - lay the foundations for modern mathematics.

    * Many of these images have shattered our preconceptions about the limits and nature of existence: the first breathtaking pictures of the Earth from space stimulated an environmental consciousness that has grown ever since; the mushroom cloud from atomic and nuclear explosions became the ultimate symbol of death and destruction; the flying saucer came to represent the possibility of extraterrestrial life; while Mercator's flat map of the Earth coordinated an entire world-view.

    * Cosmic Imagery takes us on a tour through the most influential images in science. Each holds an important place in the growth of human understanding and carries with it a story that illuminates its origin and meaning. Together they reveal something of the beauty and truth of the universe, and why, so often, a picture is better than a thousand words.

  • The constants of nature are the numbers that define the essence of the Universe. They tell us how strong its forces are, and what its fundamental laws can do: the strength of gravity, of magnetism, the speed of light, and the masses of the smallest particles of matter. They encode the deepest secrets of the Universe and express at once our greatest knowledge and our greatest ignorance about the cosmos. Their existence has taught us the profound truth that Nature abounds with unseen regularities. Yet, while we have become skilled at measuring the values of these constants, our frustrating inability to explain or predict their values shows how much we still have to learn about the inner workings of the Universe. What is the ultimate status of these constants of Nature? Are they truly constant? Could life have evolved and persisted if they were even slightly different? And are there other Universes where they are different? These are some of the issues that this book grapples with. It looks back to the discoveries of the first constants of Nature and the impact they had on scientists like Einstein. This book also tells the story of a tantalising new development in astronomy. For the first time astronomical observations are suggesting that some of the constants of Nature were different when the Universe was younger. So are our laws of Nature slowly changing? Is anything about our Universe immune from the ravages of time? Are there any constants of Nature at all?

  • 'If people do not believe that mathematics is simple, it is only because they do not realize how complicated life is.' John von Neumann Mathematics can tell you things about the world that can't be learned in any other way. This hugely informative and wonderfully entertaining Brain Shot answers a few essential questions about existence. It unravels the knotty, clarifies the conundrums and sheds light into dark corners. From winning the lottery, financial investment with Time Travellers and the weirdest football match ever to Sherlock Holmes, Elections, game theory, drunks, packing for your holiday and the madness of crowds; from chaos to infinity and everything in between, Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know has all the answers!

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    BRAIN SHOTS: The byte-sized guide to all the things you didn't know you didn't know...

  • Infinity is surely the strangest idea that humans have ever had. Where did it come from and what is it telling us about our Universe? Can there actually be infinities? Can you do an infinite number of things in a finite amount of time? Is the Universe infinite?



    Infinity is also the place where things happen that don't. What is it like to live in a Universe where nothing is original, where you can live forever, where anything that can be done, is done, over and over again?



    These are some of the deep questions that the idea of the infinite pushes us to ask. Throughout history, the infinite has been a dangerous concept. Many have lost their lives, their careers, or their freedom for talking about it. The Infinite Book will take you on a tour of these dangerous questions and the strange answers that scientists, mathematicians, philosophers and theologians have come up with to deal with its threats to our sanity.

  • What can maths tell us about sports?



    100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know About Sport sheds light on the mysteries of running, jumping, swimming and points scoring across the whole sporting spectrum. Whether you are a competitor striving to go faster or higher, or an armchair enthusiast wanting to understand more, this is a fascinating read with one hundred short pieces that range across a wide number of sports. Find out:



    * Why high-jumpers use the Fosbury Flop, * How fast Usain Bolt can ultimately run and how he could break his records without running any faster, * Whether there is a limit to human performance, * Who the strongest man or woman is, pound for pound, * Why there are so many different scoring systems in sport, * If a 100-kilogram mass weighs more in London than it does in Singapore, * What the best strategy for taking football penalties is, * What the effect of those banned skin-tight swimsuits are, * Why golf balls are dimpled, * And last, but not least, why does the bounce of a Superball seem to defy Newton's laws of motion.



    Written for anyone interested in sport or simple maths, this book will enrich your understanding of sport and enliven your appreciation of maths.

  • From the zeros of the mathematician to the void of the philosophers, from Shakespeare tot he empty set, from the ether to the quantum vacuum, from being and nothingness to creatio ex nihilo, there is much ado about nothing at the heart of things. Recent exciting discoveries in astronomy are shown to shed new light on the nature of the vacuum and its dramatic effect upon the explanation of the Universe. This remarkable book ranges over every nook and cranny of nothingness to reveal how the human mind has had to make something of nothing in every field of human enquiry.

  • * How can sprinter Usain Bolt break his world record without running any faster?



    * Why do high-jumpers use the Fosbury Flop?



    * What's the best strategy for taking penalties in football?



    * What statistical advantage do left-handed boxers have over their right-handed opponents?



    * And did you know that gymnasts can experience stronger g-forces than roller-coaster designers are allowed to create?



    John D. Barrow shows how maths can give us surprising and enlivening insights into the world of sports - essential reading for competitors, armchair enthusiasts and maths-lovers alike.

  • Will we ever discover a single scientific theory that tells us everything that has happened, and everything that will happen, on every level in the Universe? The quest for the theory of everything - a single key that unlocks all the secrets of the Universe - is no longer a pipe-dream, but the focus of some of our most exciting research about the structure of the cosmos. But what might such a theory look like? What would it mean? And how close are we to getting there?In New Theories of Everything, John D. Barrow describes the ideas and controversies surrounding the ultimate explanation. Updating his earlier work Theories of Everything with the very latest theories and predictions, he tells of the M-theory of superstrings and multiverses, of speculations about the world as a computer program, and of new ideas of computation and complexity. But this is not solely a book about modern ideas in physics -- Barrow also considers and reflects onthe philosophical and cultural consequences of those ideas, and their implications for our own existence in the world.Far from there being a single theory uniquely specifying the constants and forces of nature, the picture today is of a vast landscape of different logically possible laws and constants in many dimensions, of which our own world is but a shadow: a tiny facet of a higher dimensional reality. But this is not to say we should give up in bewilderment: Barrow shows how many rich and illuminating theories and questions arise, and what this may mean for our understanding of our own place in thecosmos.

  • Will we ever discover a single scientific theory that tells us everything that has happened, and everything that will happen, on every level in the Universe? The quest for the theory of everything - a single key that unlocks all the secrets of the Universe - is no longer a pipe-dream, but the focus of some of our most exciting research about the structure of the cosmos. But what might such a theory look like? What would it mean? And how close are we to getting there?In New Theories of Everything, John D. Barrow describes the ideas and controversies surrounding the ultimate explanation. Updating his earlier work Theories of Everything with the very latest theories and predictions, he tells of the M-theory of superstrings and multiverses, of speculations about the world as a computer program, and of new ideas of computation and complexity. But this is not solely a book about modern ideas in physics -- Barrow also considers and reflects onthe philosophical and cultural consequences of those ideas, and their implications for our own existence in the world.Far from there being a single theory uniquely specifying the constants and forces of nature, the picture today is of a vast landscape of different logically possible laws and constants in many dimensions, of which our own world is but a shadow: a tiny facet of a higher dimensional reality. But this is not to say we should give up in bewilderment: Barrow shows how many rich and illuminating theories and questions arise, and what this may mean for our understanding of our own place in thecosmos.

  • What can maths tell us about art and design?



    Professor John D. Barrow has all the answers. In 100 Essential Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know About Maths and the Arts, he shows us that mathematics and the arts are not so far removed from each other. He takes us on a 100-step tour, guiding us through art forms as various as sculpture, literature, architecture and dance, and reveals what maths can tell us about the mysteries of the worlds of art and design.



    We find out why diamonds sparkle, how many words Shakespeare knew and why the shower is the best place to sing. We discover why an egg is egg-shaped, why Charles Dickens crusaded against maths and how a soprano can shatter a wine glass without touching it...



    Enlivening the everyday with a new way of looking at the world, this book will enrich your understanding of the maths and art that surround us in our day-to-day lives.

  • The easy way to get your head around company finance Having an understanding of your company's finances is crucial for both small business owners and   corporate managers with budget responsibilities. Understanding Business Accounting For Dummies simplifies the key elements of UK business accounting, covering everything from evaluating profit margins  to  writing financial reports. Fully updated to cover the emergence of IFRS and dealing with foreign exchange, this new edition  thoroughly outlines the essentials of business accounting. With comprehensive guidance and helpful strategies, this book makes light work of the financial fundamentals you need to move up the corporate ladder Use the latest technology to manage the bottom line Control profit and cash flow Budget with confidence Make sense of financial statements Survive an audit  If you're ready to balance your budget, boost your profit margin and enhance your career profile, this hands-on guide has everything you need to get started.

  • Not everyone is cut out to be a professional accountant, but those who want to move up the corporate ladder know that they need to master the essentials of accounting.  Understanding Business Accounting For Dummies, 2nd Edition makes truly light work of the financial fundamentals that many businesspeople try to bluff their way through every day. The book will show you how to evaluate profit margins, establish budgets, control profit and cash flow, stem losses, manage inventory, make wise financial decisions, survive an audit, and use the latest computer technology to help you manage the bottom line. This updated edition also includes the latest information on International Financial Reporting Standards, capital budgeting, and break even, plus new advice on how to find financial facts and read company accounts.  New sections include links to a number of key business spreadsheets and a new chapter on financing your business.

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