Joseph Stiglitz

  • Nobel Laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains why we are experiencing such destructively high levels of inequality - and why this is not inevitable The top 1 percent have the best houses, the best educations, the best doctors, and the best lifestyles, but there is one thing that money doesn't seem to have bought: an understanding that their fate is bound up with how the other 99 percent live. Throughout history, this is something that the top 1 percent eventually do learn - too late.

    In this timely book, Joseph Stiglitz identifies three major causes of our predicament: that markets don't work the way they are supposed to (being neither efficient nor stable); how political systems fail to correct the shortcomings of the market; and how our current economic and political systems are fundamentally unfair. He focuses chiefly on the gross inequality to which these systems give rise, but also explains how inextricably interlinked they are. Providing evidence that investment - not austerity - is vital for productivity, and offering realistic solutions for levelling the playing field and increasing social mobility, Stiglitz argues that reform of our economic and political systems is not just fairer, but is the only way to make markets work as they really should.

    Joseph Stiglitz was Chief Economist at the World Bank until January 2000. He is currently University Professor of the Columbia Business School and Chair of the Management Board and Director of Graduate Summer Programs, Brooks World Poverty Institute, University of Manchester. He won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 2001 and is the best-selling author of Globalization and Its Discontents, The Roaring Nineties, Making Globalization Work and Freefall, all published by Penguin.

  • Why has inequality increased in the Western world - and what can we do about it? In The Great Divide, Joseph E. Stiglitz expands on the diagnosis he offered in his best-selling book The Price of Inequality and suggests ways to counter this growing problem. With his characteristic blend of clarity and passion, Stiglitz argues that inequality is a choice - the cumulative result of unjust policies and misguided priorities.

    In these essays, articles and reflections, Stiglitz fully exposes the inequality - from its dimensions and its causes to its consequences for the world - that is afflicting America and other Western countries in thrall to neoliberalism. From Reagan-era policies to the Great Recession and its long aftermath, Stiglitz delves into the processes and irresponsible policies - deregulation, tax cuts for the rich, the corruption of the political process - that are leaving many people further and further behind and turning the dream of a socially mobile society into an ever more unachievable myth. With formidable yet accessible economic insight, he urges us to embrace real solutions: increasing taxes on corporations and the wealthy; investing in education, science, and infrastructure; helping homeowners instead of banks; and, most importantly, doing more to restore the economy to full employment. Stiglitz's analysis reaches beyond America - the inequality leader of the developed world - to draw lessons from Scandinavia, Singapore, and Japan, and he argues against the tide of unnecessary, destructive austerity that is sweeping across Europe.

    Ultimately, Stiglitz believes our choice is not between growth and fairness; with the right policies, we can choose both.

  • Solidarity and prosperity fostered by economic integration: this principle has underpinned the European project from the start, and the establishment of a common currency was supposed to be its most audacious and tangible achievement. Since 2008, however, the European Union has ricocheted between stagnation and crisis. The inability of the eurozone to match the recovery in the USA and UK has exposed its governing structures, institutions and policies as dysfunctional and called into question the viability of a common currency shared by such different economies as Germany and Greece.Designed to bring the European Union closer together, the euro has actually done the opposite: after nearly a decade without growth, unity has been replaced with dissent and enlargements with prospective exits. Joseph Stiglitz argues that Europe's stagnation and bleak outlook are a direct result of the fundamental flaws inherent in the euro project - economic integration outpacing political integration with a structure that promotes divergence rather than convergence. Money relentlessly leaves the weaker member states and goes to the strong, with debt accumulating in a few ill-favoured countries. The question then is: Can the euro be saved?Laying bare the European Central Bank's misguided inflation-only mandate and explaining why austerity has condemned Europe to unending stagnation, Stiglitz outlines the fundamental reforms necessary to the structure of the eurozone and the policies imposed on the member countries suffering the most. But the same lack of sufficient political solidarity that led to the creation of a flawed euro twenty years ago suggests that these reforms are unlikely to be adopted. Hoping to avoid the huge costs associated with current policies, Stiglitz proposes two other alternatives: a well-managed end to the common currency; or a bold, new system dubbed 'the flexible euro.' This important book, by one of the world's leading economists, addresses the euro-crisis on a bigger intellectual scale than any predecessor.

  • From Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, Globalization and its Discontents is the bestselling exposé of the all-powerful organizations that control our lives.Joseph Stiglitz's landmark book lifted the lid on how globalization was hurting those it was meant to help. Many of its predictions came true, and it became a touchstone in the debate. This major new edition looks afresh at the continuing mismanagement of globalization, and how it has led to our current political and economic discontents. Globalization can still be a force for good, Stiglitz argues. But the balance of power has to change. Here he offers real, tough solutions for the future. 'A massively important political as well as economic document ... we should listen to him urgently' Will Hutton, Guardian 'Stiglitz is a rare breed, an heretical economist who has ruffled the self-satisfied global establishment that once fed him. Globalization and its Discontents declares war on the entire Washington financial and economic establishment' Ian Fraser, Sunday Herald 'Gripping ... this landmark book shows him to be a worthy successor to Keynes' Robin Blackburn, Independent

  • La dialectique infernale du pouvoir et des profits a fini par exaspérer le peuple. Voici le grand réquisitoire du prix Nobel d'économie Joseph E. Stiglitz sur ces questions.

  • Un livre qui déménage et qui va faire beaucoup de bruit. L'économiste vivant le plus lu dans le monde, prix Nobel, revient dans son premier grand livre consacré à l'Europe sur les contradictions inhérentes à une monnaie qui a été conçue pour rapprocher les peuples et amener la prospérité et qui a fini par les diviser et plomber son économie. 

  • Après Le Triomphe de la cupidité (Les Liens qui libèrent, 2010 ; Babel n° 1042, 2011), le grand livre sur les inégalités que lon attendait par Joseph Stiglitz. Le célèbre prix Nobel montre combien les inégalités ont prospéré dans nos sociétés, combien elles sont néfastes à nos économies et dangereuses pour la paix sociale.

  • Construire une économie et une société capables d'apprendre, une « nouvelle société de la connaissance », indispensable à l'élévation de la prospérité de nos pays : tel est le défi relevé par les éminents économistes Joseph Stiglitz et Bruce Greenwald. 

  • Joseph Stiglitz est prix Nobel d'économie, ancien économiste en chef de la Banque mondiale. Il s'intéresse aux causes et conséquences des inégalités et a publié de nombreux ouvrages parmi lesquels Le prix de l'inégalité (vendu à plus de 35 000 exemplaires, hors édition de poche) et Le triomphe de la cupidité (50 000 ex, hors poche).

  • It was a part of the wisdom of mainstream economics that in the early stages of development inequality would rise but as growth persisted, it would, eventually, decline. Early evidence seemed to suggest that this pattern would be borne out. But, as time passed and growth persisted, inequality continued to grow, casting doubt on the received wisdom. The aim of this two-volume book is to analyze the current state of global and regional inequality, dissect the phenomenal increase in inequality that we have seen occur in recent times, and better understand the complex relationship between inequality and development. The political instability and conflict that we see around the world, arguably, has connection to economic deprivation of large segments of society and the perception of marginalization. This two-volume work acquires a special significance in the light of these developments.

  • Joseph Stiglitz examines the theory behind the economic downturns that have plagued our world in recent times. This fascinating three-part lecture acknowledges the failure of economic models to successfully predict the 2008 crisis and explores alternative models which, if adopted, could potentially restore a stable and prosperous economy.

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