History Press Digital

  • Anglais 1888

    Stubley Peter

    In 1888 Jack the Ripper made the headlines with a series of horrific murders that remain unsolved to this day. But most killers are not shadowy figures stalking the streets with a lust for blood. Many are ordinary citizens driven to the ultimate crime by circumstance, a fit of anger or a desire for revenge. Their crimes, overshadowed by the few, sensational cases, are ignored, forgotten or written off. This book examines all the known murders in London in 1888 to build a picture of society. Who were the victims? How did they live, and how did they die? Why did a husband batter his wife to death after she failed to get him a cup of tea? How many died under the wheels of a horse-driven cab? Just how dangerous was London in 1888?

  • Samuel Herbert Dougal was intelligent, talented, and the recipient of a military medal. Outwardly, he seemed to embody all that Victorian England valued most. But he was also a career criminal whose appetite for sex and money propelled him through scandal after scandal; through the courts, prisons and asylums; and from woman to vulnerable woman. In 1903, the unexplained disappearance of Dougal's latest inamorata, a wealthy spinster named Miss Holland, began to excite public speculation. A tireless hunt for the missing lady commenced, but, having been arrested on a sample charge of forgery, Dougal simply decided to wait it out. Meanwhile, on the outside, his real wife, Sarah, who had been the beneficiary of Dougal's schemes over the course of a decade, had her own plans to escape official scrutiny. Would Miss Holland's whereabouts be discovered? And who, if anyone, would be held to account for her disappearance?

  • Delving deep into Titanic's legacy, Allen Gibson presents a comprehensive history with a refreshing argument, that Titanic represented a considerable achievement in maritime architecture. He determines the true causes of the disaster, telling the story of the 'unsinkable' ship against a backdrop of a tumultuous and rapidly emerging technological world. The book exposes the true interests of the people involved in the operation, regulation and investigation into Titanic, and lays bare the technology so dramatically destroyed. Juxtaposing the duelling worlds of economics and safety, this study rationalises the mindset that wilfully dispatched the world's largest ship out to sea with a deficient supply of lifeboats. Using original material, this fascinating book explores not only how the sinking occurred but also examines the significance and allure of Titanic as well as boldly establishing a future for the wreck itself.

  • In December 1943, a top secret contract (E.24/43) was awarded to Miles Aircraft. The contract was to build the world's first supersonic jet capable of 1000mph. The only reliable source of data on supersonic objects came from the Armament Research Dept and their wind tunnel tests on ammunition. From this, Miles developed an exceptionally thin-winged, bullet-shaped aircraft. the research was inexplicably passed to the Americans in 1944. By December 1945, one prototype was virtually complete. The second, destined for an attempt at the sound barrier was 80 per cent complete. In February 1946, Capt Eric Brown was confirmed as the test pilot and October 1946 was set for the supersonic trials. However, on 12 February 1946, Miles were ordered to stop production. No plausible explanation was given for the cancellation when Britain was within six months of breaking the sound barrier. Eric Brown and others directly involved including Dennis Bancroft, the Chief Aerodynamicist on the M.52, have now come together to try and finally solve the mystery behind the cancellation.

  • Arthur led the Britons to the brink of victory but was cut down by treachery and betrayal. Arthurian legends have since been corrupted, leading to popular but false assumptions about the king and the belief that his grave could never be found. Drawing on a vast range of sources and new translations of early British and Gaelic poetry, Arthur explodes these myths and exposes the shocking truth. In this, the first full biography of Arthur, Simon Andrew Stirling provides a range of proofs that Arthur mac Aedain was the original King Arthur; he identifies the original Camelot, the site of Arthur's last battle and his precise burial location. For the first time ever, the role played by the early Church in Arthur's downfall and the fall of North Britain is also revealed. This included the Church's contribution to fabricated Arthurian history, the unusual circumstances of his buiral and the extraordinary history of the sacred isle on which he was buried.

  • This miscellany will explore the fascinating and enigmatic world of Sherlock Holmes, examining his place in literary history, his popularity, and how he has become the iconic, timeless character who is loved by millions. Containing all of the facts, trivia and quotes that feature in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's legendary stories and the subsequent film and television adaptations, The Sherlock Holmes Miscellany also explores the often weird and wonderful characters who graced Conan Doyle's pages and explains the terms used in the original stories that might cause unnecessary - albeit amusing - confusion to the modern reader. For example: 'Knocked up' had a considerably different meaning in the 19th century; if you think a 'life preserver' is a cork-filled flotation device, how does Wilson Kemp fit one into the sleeve of his jacket? Would you try to warm your hands with a Gasogene? All of these and more are included in this light-hearted and highly informative miscellany, offering something to both the dedicated Sherlockian and those new to the world of 221b Baker Street.

  • During the First World War, The Cameron Highlanders was expanded to thirteen battalions, of which nine were in battle. The 1st, 2nd, 4th (TF), 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th and 11th Battalions all fought on the Western Front. Ten representative battle honours were chosen to be displayed on the King's colour, amongst them Neuve Chapelle and Loos, where the 4th Battalion suffered terrible losses. Note the (TF) after their designation - these were territorials, not professional soldiers, yet they did nothing to undermine the honour and the fearsome reputation of the Highland divisions. Using unpublished diaries, letters and memoirs together with original photographs and newspaper accounts, this book focuses on the stories of the men of the 4th Camerons who went so eagerly to war in August 1914. It charts the progress of these 'Saturday night soldiers' through their training in Bedford with the Highland Division to their participation through all the major battles of 1915 and their disbandment in February 1916. What makes this book unique is the close focus on a single battalion, something that makes the narrative so much more immediate than sweeping strategic descriptions at army or even divisional level.

  • Life in the historic county of Hampshire has not always been peaceful, for over the years it has experienced numerous murders, some of which are little known outside the county borders, others that have shocked the nation. These include the killing of 'Sweet Fanny Adams' in 1867; the horrific murder committed by the postmaster at Grayshott in 1901; the mysterious poisoning of Hubert Chevis in 1943; and the gun battle in the village of Kingsclere in 1944, which resulted in the deaths of three people. Nicola Sly's carefully researched, well-illustrated and enthralling text will appeal to anyone interested in the shady side of Hampshire's history, and should give much food for thought.

  • Shropshire Murders brings together numerous murderous tales, some of which were little known outside the county, and others which made national headlines. Contained within the pages of this book are the stories behind some of the most heinous crimes ever committed in Shropshire. They include the Revd Robert Foulkes, who killed his illegitimate child in 1678; the murder of Catherine Lewis by John Mapp in Longden in 1867; the horrific axe murders committed by John Doughty at Church Stretton in 1924; and the tragic death of Dennis O'Neill, who was beaten and starved by his foster parents in 1944. Nicola Sly's carefully researched and enthralling text will appeal to anyone interested in the shady side of Shropshire's history.

  • Contained within the pages of this book are the stories behind some of the most notorious murders in Cambridgeshire's history.

  • Since the brutal slaying of the Rev. John Hay, vicar of South Brent, dragged from his church and slaughtered in 1436, Devon has had its fair share of 'murder most foul'. This book recounts several notable cases, from the killing of Sarah and Edward Glass at Wadland Down in 1827, and the poisonings of Samuel Wescombe in Exeter in 1829 and William Ashford at Honiton Clyst in 1866, both by wives whose affections had gones elsewhere; to the horrific murder of Emma Doidge and her boyfriend William Rowe by the former's jilted suitor at Peter Tavey in 1892, the strangling of schoolgirl Alice Gregory in 1916, and the triple murder of Emily Maye and her daughters at West Charleton, Kingsbridge, in 1936, which remains unsolved to this day. Above all, there is an account of Devon's most famous case, the murder of Emma Keyse at Babbacombe and the convicted servant John Lee - the man they couldn't hang. John Van der Kiste's carefully researched, well-illustrated and enthralling text will appeal to anyone interested in the shady side of Devon's history.

  • Contained within the pages of this book are the stories behind some of the most notorious murders in Lancashire's history. The cases covered here record the county's most fascinating but least known crimes, as well as famous murders that gripped not just Lancashire but the whole nation. From Liverpool's Florence Maybrick (was she really guilty of poisoning her hypochondriac husband with arsenic and was he indeed Jack the Ripper?) to late Victorian Bury's disturbing 'Body in the Wardrobe' case; from the infamous Drs Ruxton and Clements who saw off five wives between them, to Blackpool's Louisa Merrifield, whole loose tongue was undoubtedly her downfall, this is a collection of the county's most dramatic and interesting criminal cases. Alan Hayhurst has been uncovering evidence about the county's historic murders for more than forty years. In writing this book he has visited all the murder sites, consulted original documents and contemporary reports, and spoken to those who have personal memories of the cases concerned. Lancashire Murders is a unique re-examination of the darker side of the county's past.

  • Anglais Norfolk Murders

    Storey Neil

    Contained with the pages of this book are the stories behind some of the most notorious murders in Norfolk's history. The cases covered here record the county's most fascinating but least known crimes, as well as famous murders that gripped not just Norfolk but the whole nation. From the Burnham Poisoners of 1835 to the Yarmouth Beach Murders, from the Pixworth Horror to 'the last judicial beheading in England', this is a collection of the county's most dramatic and interesting criminal cases. Neil R Storey has gone back to original records and documents to uncover the truth about these extraordinary crimes. Using contemporary illustrations and tracing the stories through the words of those who were actually there on the ground, he re-creates the drama of case and courtroom. Norfolk Murders is a unique re-examination of the darker side of the county's past.

  • From Warwick to Rugby, from Coventry to Nuneaton and from Stratford to Leamington Spa, Warwickshire Murders is a powerful and fascinating reappraisal of some of the most brutal and gruesome killings in the county's history, and is sure to appeal to crime enthusiasts.

  • Since its publication in 1897, there have been suggestions that the fictional exploits of Dracula were more closely associated with Jack the Ripper than a Transylvanian Count. Historian Neil Storey provides the first British-based investigation of the sources used by Stoker and paints an evocative portrait of Stoker, his influences, friends and the London he knew in the late 19th century. Among Stoker's group of friends, however, were dark shadows. Storey explores how Stoker created Dracula out of the climate of fear that surrounded the Jack the Ripper murders in 1888. Add to this potent combination the notion that Stoker may have known Jack the Ripper personally and hid the clues to this terrible knowledge in his book. The premise is seductive and connects some of the giants of stage and literature of late Victorian Britain. Having gained unprecedented access to the unique archive of one of Stoker's most respected friends and the dedicatee of Dracula, Storey sheds new light on both Stoker and Dracula, and reveals startling new insights into the links between Stoker's creation and the most infamous murderer of all time.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The Canterbury Book of Days contains a quirky, eccentric, amusing or important event or fact from different periods of history, many of which had a major impact on the religious and political history of England as a whole. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information gleaned from the vault's of Canterbury's archives, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The Portsmouth Book of Days contains a quirky, eccentric, amusing or important event or fact from different periods of history, many of which had a major impact on, or reflect, the social and political history of England as a whole. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information gleaned from the vaults of Portsmouth's archives, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The Edinburgh Book of Days contains a quirky, eccentric, amusing or important event or fact from different period of history, many of which had a major impact on the religious and political history of Scotland as a whole. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information gleaned from the vaults of Edinburgh's archives, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The Cardiff Book of Days contains a quicky, eccentric, amusing or important event or fact from different periods of history, many of which had a major impact on the religious and political history of Britain as a whole. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information gleaned from the vaults of Cardiff's archives, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The York Book of Days contains a quirky, eccentric, amusing or important event or fact from different periods of history, many of which had a major impact on the religious and political history of England as a whole. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information gleaned from the vaults of York's archives, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Taking you through the year day by day, The Sheffield Book of Days contains quirky, eccentric, amusing and important events and facts from different periods of history. Events include matters of national importance such as the Coronation of George IV, as well as local incidents such as the Sheffield Outrages and accounts of riots in the town. There are amusing incidents from the local newspaper, for example the punishments inflicted on young boys for playing 'trip' during Divine Service and an outbreak of people being bitten by 'mad dogs'. Ideal for dipping into, this addictive little book will keep you entertained and informed. Featuring hundreds of snippets of information, it will delight residents and visitors alike.

  • Edinburgh is one of the most beautiful cities in the world - with one of the darkest histories on record. Starting with the Roman era, and sweeping through the centuries in the blood-soaked catalogue of battles, diseases, royal deaths and disasters, this is history as you have never read it before. With horrible tales involving Mary, Queen of Scots, James VI and Bonnie Prince Charlie, as well as the execution of the Marquis of Montrose - and the story of his stolen heart - only the bravest of readers should open it. Containing riots, murders, severed heads, sieges and the bull's head that sparked a clan massacre, read it if you dare!

  • Discover the darker side of Norfolk with this remarkable collection of true-life crimes from across the county. Featuring tales of some of the most notorious, nefarious and murderous characters from the county's past, including pirates, smugglers, highwaymen, poachers, thieves, murderers and bodysnatchers, all faction of the criminal underworld are included in this macabre selection of tales. Drawing on a wide variety of historical sources and containing many cases which have never before been published, Norfolk Villains will fascinate everyone interested in true crime and the history of Norfolk.

  • Concorde Conspiracy', the story of Concorde and the American Supersonic Transport (SST) project, is one of spies, lies, arrogance, dirty tricks and presidential hatred. It is one of deceit, treachery, mistrust and confusion. The Americans were initially dismissive of Anglo-French efforts, then arrogant to the point that they thought that not only could they do better, but they were the only ones capable of completing the project. President Kennedy said "...make it happen, make it bigger, make it faster." He might have added: "...make it to beat my presidential in France". This is the story of ten years of behind the scenes political intrigue, the author making use of inside information from two American Presidents, the CIA, and teh Federal Aviation Authority.

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