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  • Why do so many people go on about queuing? Have we always been obsessed with traffic? And why do so many of us now eat lunch at our computers - al desko?
    We spend our days catching buses and trains, writing emails, shopping, queuing...But we know almost nothing about these activities. Exploring the history of these subjects as they come up during a typical day, starting with eating breakfast and ending with sleeping, Joe Moran tells a story about hidden social and cultural changes in Britain since the Second World War. Drawing on his academic research on everyday life, but writing with wit and lucidity for a popular audience, he shows that we know less about ourselves than we think...

  • Anglais Body Count

    Peter Gill

    With 20 million dead and another 40 million infected, AIDS is the world's worst epidemic, but the catastrophe could have been prevented. This book shows how millions could have been saved and many millions more infections could have been prevented if the world had responded properly to the crisis. Peter Gill reveals how politicians and religious leaders in both the rich and poor worlds have failed in their duty to protect their people from the disease. Simple messages about safe sex and condoms have been consistently downplayed out of embarrassment or misplaced moral fervour. Just as the world begins to wake up to the enormity of the AIDS disaster, the America of George W. Bush is threatening to undermine the global effort. The Christian Right has decided that sexual abstinence is the answer to the pandemic. Big business manoeuvres to protect the profits of the pharmaceutical industry against cheap AIDS drugs from developing countries. And the US challenges every other Aids initiative that does not square with its determination to export a conservative and Christian ideology. Twenty-five years on from the first identification of AIDS in America in 1981, this book at last fixes historical and contemporary responsibility for the tragedy.

  • Science starts to get interesting when things don't make sense.
    Even today there are experimental results that the most brilliant scientists can neither explain nor dismiss. In the past, similar anomalies have revolutionised our world: in the sixteenth century, a set of celestial irregularities led Copernicus to realise that the Earth goes around the sun and not the reverse. In 13 Things That Don't Make Sense Michael Brooks meets thirteen modern-day anomalies that may become tomorrow's breakthroughs.
    Is ninety six percent of the universe missing? If no study has ever been able to definitively show that the placebo effect works, why has it become a pillar of medical science? Was the 1977 signal from outer space a transmission from an alien civilization? Spanning fields from chemistry to cosmology, psychology to physics, Michael Brooks thrillingly captures the excitement and controversy of the scientific unknown.

  • 'Machiavelli has a new rival, and Sun-tzu had better watch his back' - New York Times
    Robert Greene's laws are now famous:
    Law 1: Never outshine the master.
    Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends; learn how to use enemies.
    Law 3: Conceal your intentions.
    Law 4: Always say less than necessary.
    At work, in relationships, on the street or on the 6 o'clock News: the 48 Laws apply everywhere. For anyone with an interest in conquest, self-defence, wealth, power or simply being an educated spectator, The 48 Laws of Power is one of the most useful and entertaining books ever; it 'teaches you how to cheat, dissemble, feign, fight and advance your cause in the modern world.' (Independent on Sunday). Robert Greene will teach you the distilled wisdom of the masters - illustrated through the tactics, triumphs and failures from Elizabeth I to Henry Kissinger on how to get to the top and stay there. Wry, ironic and clever, this is an indispensable and witty guide to power.
    The perfect gift book for the power-hungry (and who doesn't want power?); this is the Concise Edition of an international bestseller.
    From the internationally bestselling author of Mastery, The Art Of Seduction, and The 33 Strategies Of War.

  • From bestselling author Robert Greene comes a new guide to the strategies of war that can help us gain mastery in the modern world. Spanning world civilisations, and synthesising dozens of political, philosophical, and religious texts, The Concise 33 Strategies of War is a guide to the subtle social game of everyday life. Based on profound and timeless lessons, it is abundantly illustrated with examples of the genius and folly of everyone from Napoleon to Margaret Thatcher and Hannibal to Ulysses S. Grant, as well as diplomats, captains of industry and Samurai swordsmen.

  • Anglais Mojo

    Marshall Goldsmith

    The follow-up to global bestseller What Got You Here Won't Get You There (the Amazon.com no.1 bestseller for 2007 on Leading People) addresses the vital phases of gaining mojo (tough), maintaining it (tougher) and recapturing it after you lose it (toughest of all, but not impossible) This is vital in any competitive arena, whether business, sport or politics.
    Goldsmith draws on new research, as well as his extensive experience with corporate teams and top executives, to provide compelling case studies throughout. Readers will learn the 26 powers that are within us all and will come away with a new, hyper-effective technique to define, track and ensure future success for themselves and their organisations.
    Goldsmith's one-on-one training usually comes with a six-figure price tag. Now his advice is available without the hefty fee.

  • Nations are not trapped by their pasts, but events that happened hundreds or even thousands of years ago continue to exert huge influence on present-day politics. If we are to understand the politics that we now take for granted, we need to understand its origins.
    Francis Fukuyama examines the paths that different societies have taken to reach their current forms of political order. This book starts with the very beginning of mankind and comes right up to the eve of the French and American revolutions, spanning such diverse disciplines as economics, anthropology and geography. The Origins of Political Order is a magisterial study on the emergence of mankind as a political animal, by one of the most eminent political thinkers writing today.

  • Anglais Just My Type

    Simon Garfield

    Just My Type is not just a font book, but a book of stories. About how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. About why Barack Obama opted for Gotham, while Amy Winehouse found her soul in 30s Art Deco. About the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, or people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook, or Margaret Calvert, who invented the motorway signs that are used from Watford Gap to Abu Dhabi. About the pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers ... and typefaces became something we realised we all have an opinion about.
    As the Sunday Times review put it, the book is 'a kind of Eats, Shoots and Leaves for letters, revealing the extent to which fonts are not only shaped by but also define the world in which we live.'
    This edition is available with both black and silver covers.

  • Anglais Secret Affairs

    Mark Curtis

    The updated edition of Secret Affairs covers the momentous events of the past year in the Middle East. It reveals the unreported attempts by Britain to cultivate relations with the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt after the fall of Mubarak, the military intervention on the side of Libyan rebel forces which include pro-al-Qaeda elements, and the ongoing reliance on the region's ultimate fundamentalist state, Saudi Arabia, to safeguard its interest in the Middle East.
    In this ground-breaking book, Mark Curtis reveals the covert history of British collusion with radical Islamic and terrorist groups. Secret Affairs shows how governments since the 1940s have connived with militant forces to control oil resources and overthrow governments. The story of how Britain has helped nurture the rise of global terrorism has never been told.

  • Anglais The Small Hand

    Susan Hill

    Late one summer evening, antiquarian bookseller Adam Snow is returning from a client visit when he takes a wrong turn. He stumbles across a derelict Edwardian house, and compelled by curiosity, approaches the door. Standing before the entrance, he feels the unmistakable sensation of a small cold hand creeping into his own, 'as if a child had taken hold of it'.
    At first he is merely puzzled by the odd incident but then begins to suffer attacks of fear and panic, and is visited by nightmares. He is determined to learn more 'about the house and its once-magnificent, now overgrown garden but when he does so, he receives further, increasingly sinister, visits from the small hand.

  • Anglais We-Think

    Charles Leadbeater

    Society is no longer based on mass consumption but on mass participation. New forms of collaboration - such as Wikipedia and YouTube - are paving the way for an age in which people want to be players, rather than mere spectators, in the production process. In the 1980s, Charles Leadbeater's prescient book, In Search of Work, anticipated the growth of flexible employment. Now We-think explains how the rise of mass collaboration will affect us and the world in which we live.

  • Anglais The Answers

    Lucy Kellaway

    Should I tell my boss what I think of him?"How can I be more political and still be myself?"I have to sack my friend or fire someone better."I am a foreigner and my views are ignoredTypical conundrums faced by many of us, and just a few of the hundreds sent every week to Lucy Kellaway's popular 'agony aunt' column in the Financial Times. The sharp down-to-earth advice is invaluable for anyone negotiating the minefield of the modern office. Whether it's a problem of working with an ex-lover, firing a litigious employee or dealing with accusations of racism, Kellaway's advice is always simple and practical, and essential reading for those trying to cope with troublesome co-workers. Better still, there is the wisdom, rage, expertise and folly of the managers and self-appointed experts who add their thoughts. This is like Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? for business. And very funny too.

  • Anglais Free Radicals

    Michael Brooks

    For more than a century, science has cultivated a sober public image for itself. But as bestselling author Michael Brooks explains, the truth is very different: many of our most successful scientists have more in common with libertines than librarians.
    This thrilling exploration of some of the greatest breakthroughs in science reveals the extreme lengths some scientists go to in order to make their theories public. Fraud, suppressing evidence and unethical or reckless PR games are sometimes necessary to bring the best and most brilliant discoveries to the world's attention. Inspiration can come from the most unorthodox of places, and Brooks introduces us to Nobel laureates who get their ideas through drugs, dreams and hallucinations. Science is a highly competitive and ruthless discipline, and only its most determined and passionate practitioners make headlines - and history. To succeed, knowledge must be pursued by any means: in science, anything goes.
    'Brooks is an exemplary science writer' William Leith, Daily Telegraph

  • Which battle was fought 'For England, Harry and St George'? Who demanded to be painted 'warts and all'? What - and when - was the Battle of the Bulge?
    In A Short History of England, bestselling author Simon Jenkins answers all these questions - and many more - as he tells the tumultuous story of a fascinating nation. From the invaders of the dark ages to today's coalition, via the Tudors, the Stuarts and two world wars, Jenkins weaves together a gripping narrative with all the most important and interesting dates in his own inimitable style.
    Until now there has been no short history of England covering all significant events, themes and individuals: this bestselling book, published in association with the National Trust, will be the standard work for years to come.

  • Alice and Louise are sisters united by a distant tragedy - the house fire fourteen years ago which their brother lit and burned to death in. Alice teaches dirt-poor students at a state high school that the government wants to close, while pursuing a relationship with a married man. Louise, a habitual liar and recovering heroin addict, has been playing a game of dares - 'the danger game' - with herself since she was a child, and she now can't stop. When they reunite in Melbourne to unravel the truth about their twin brother's death, and seek out the mother who abandoned them as children, they're forced to face the danger of their family's past.

  • Anglais City State

    David Kynaston

    An engaging account of the rise and dominance of the City of London, arguably the most important phenomenon of British history in the last 300 years. 'The City today is the most dynamic and world-beating sector of the British economy. Increasingly, it is the City that calls the shots. More than ever, governments and industry are constrained in their conduct by the fear of the judgement of the financial markets. This book looks back over the past 20 years and examines the extraordinary rise of this economic entity that is the City of London.

  • Anglais Cleopatra

    Joyce Tyldesley

    She was the last ruler of the Macedonian dynasty of Ptolemies who had ruled Egypt for three centuries. Highly educated (she was the only one of the Ptolemies to read and speak ancient Egyptian as well as the court Greek) and very clever (her famous liaisons with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony were as much to do with politics as the heart), she steered her kingdom through impossibly taxing internal problems and railed against greedy Roman imperialism. Stripping away preconceptions as old as her Roman enemies, Joyce Tyldesley uses all her skills as an Egyptologist to give us this magnificent biography.

  • The Colosseum was Imperial Rome's monument to warfare. Like a cathedral of death it towered over the city and invited its citizens, 50,000 at a time, to watch murderous gladiatorial games. It is now visited by two million visitors a year (Hitler was among them). Award winning classicist, Mary Beard with Keith Hopkins, tell the story of Rome's greatest arena: how it was built; the gladiatorial and other games that were held there; the training of the gladiators; the audiences who revelled in the games, the emperors who staged them and the critics. And the strange after story - the Colosseum has been fort, store, church, and glue factory.

  • The rise of China and India will be the outstanding development of the 21st century, raising fundamental questions about both the structure of the world economy and the balance of global geopolitical power. Will China still be a repressive and undemocratic regime, embracing free market economics but only when it suits? How aggressive a superpower will it be? And what about India, whose huge and growing population and economic prospects appear to guarantee prosperity? David Smith analyses the ways in which the world is tilting rapidly Eastwards, and examines all the implications of the shift in global power to Beijing, Delhi and Washington - a shift that will creep up on us before we know it.

  • We might think that the world's oil empires are invincible megaliths, dominated by American interests, but Duncan Clarke reveals the ways in which these empires will face huge challenges in the twenty-first century. Based on razor-sharp analysis of contemporary geopolitics and a deep knowledge of global history, he shows exactly why these empires are declining. He explains where the new empires of oil will be around the world; which of the hidden threats and unknown enemies are and will be the most serious; and where companies have gone wrong and can improve their global strategies. Empires of Oil reveals how the world will change because of global battles over the commodity that underpins our lives.

  • As a Chinese proverb says 'The fish rots from the head' and so it is with businesses and other organisations - the buck starts and stops in the boardroom. This third edition of Bob Garratt'sbestselling book that highlights the importance of effectivecorporate governance has been extensively updated following the corporate scandals of the early 2000s - Enron, WorldCom, Tyco - and the abysmal boardroom standards that the recent credit crunch and ensuing global financial crisis brought to light.
    This new edition builds on the Learning Board model developed by the author and now widely used internationally by corporations and public sector organisations such as the NHS. The result is a thought-provoking and highly practical book that will be invaluable to all those with responsibility for corporate governance - and also those who subject them to scrutiny.
    What Sir Adrian Cadbury, whose committee's groundbreaking report on corporate governance was published nearly twenty years ago, said about the first edition remains as true today as ever:'No director can afford to ignore this book'.

  • There are few more historic and evocative places in the world. Caesar was cremated there. Charles V and Mussolini rode by it in triumph. There Napoleon celebrated his festival of liberty. In this radical reappraisal David Watkin teaches us to see the Forum with new eyes and helps us to rediscover its rich history. This is as stimulating to the armchair traveller as it is useful as a guide to the Forum itself.
    'With verve, authority and no little humour, Watkin tells the detailed and complex story of this great but mutilated landmark ... it is an almost impossible task, superbly done' Peter Jones, BBC History Magazine
    'In this sprightly volume ... the distinguished architectural historian David Watkin charts the shifting fortunes of the site ... he has an engagingly romantic feeling for the place... deploying a good deal of sharp wit, he reveals how the relatively recent obsession with recovering the Forum's classical past has led to much unhappy destruction and much less scarcely happy invention' Matthew Sturgis, Country Life

  • This entertaining and endlessly surprising book takes us on an exploration into every aspect of Japanese society from the most public to the most intimate. A series of meticulous investigations gradually uncovers the multi-faceted nature of a country and people who are even more extraordinary than they seem. Our journey encompasses religion, ritual, martial arts, manners, eating, drinking, hot baths, geishas, family, home, singing, wrestling, dancing, performing, clans, education, aspiration, sexes, generations, race, crime, gangs, terror, war, kindness, cruelty, money, art, imperialism, emperor, countryside, city, politics, government, law and a language that varies according to whom you are speaking. Clear-sighted, persistent, affectionate, unsentimental and honest - Alan Macfarlane shows us Japan as it has never been seen before.

  • Edwin Lutyens' Memorial to the Missing of the Somme at Thiepval in Northern France, visited annually by tens of thousands of tourists, is arguably the finest structure erected by any British architect in the twentieth century. It is the principal, tangible expression of the defining event in Britain's experience and memory of the Great War, the first day of the Battle of the Somme on 1 July 1916, and it bears the names of 73,000 soldiers whose bodies were never found at the end of that bloody and futile campaign.
    This brilliant study by an acclaimed architectural historian tells the origin of the memorial in the context of commemorating the war dead; it considers the giant classical brick arch in architectural terms, and also explores its wider historical significance and its resonances today. So much of the meaning of the twentieth century is concentrated here; the Thiepval Memorial to the Missing casts a shadow into the future, a shadow which extends beyond the dead of the Holocaust, to the Gulag, to the 'disappeared' of South America and of Tianenmen.
    Reissued in a beautiful and striking new edition for the centenary of the Somme.

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