• Haley and Lynn are best friends. When Lynn meets Chad, a player several years older, Haley feels left out. She tries to be happy for her friend, but when her mother's new boyfriend starts making unwanted advances, Haley finds she has no one to tell. Not wanting to upset her mother's happiness and finding that Lynn is drifting away, Haley has to face her tormentor alone and face up to some very hard truths.

  • Nobody understands why Tori has suddenly become so moody and violent. When she attacks a stranger in a store, she ends up doing community service at a shelter for victims of domestic violence. She bonds with a little girl named Casey, but when Casey is abducted while in Tori's care, Tori is racked with guilt, certain that she should have been able to prevent the abduction. During the search for Casey, Tori comes face to face with an ex-boyfriend who sexually assaulted her at a party. Only when she speaks out about the assault is she able to begin to heal.

  • Life hasn't been easy for fifteen-year-old Lizzie Jackson since her father's sudden death four years ago. Shortly after he died, her mother, Lydia, began dating and drinking herself into oblivion, leaving Lizzie to parent her younger brother, Charlie. Things go from bad to worse when Lydia marries Dean. To protect Charlie from Dean's rage, Lizzie makes herself the target of his abuse. But when Dean sexually assaults Lizzie, things change forever. Can she continue to ensure her brother's safety after she flees their home?

  • Fiona's dad comes home after sixteen months and eight days in jail. Along with her mother and family friends, she awkwardly welcomes him home. Uncle David is there, because he picked Dad up at jail. Dad's best friend Simon, his wife May and neighbor Elisabeth are also at the house to greet Dad. He's been away so long, it's an uncomfortable reunion for Mom and Fiona, who have suffered financially, emotionally and socially in his absence. Even the dog, Honey, isn't sure about Fiona's dad anymore.
    Fiona's dad was in jail for a crime he didn't commit. Or did he? Fiona thought she knew him. Believed he was innocent. But now that he's home, her friends, her teachers, even her mom-everyone is treating him like a criminal. Guilty or not, Fiona's father has ruined everything. When she starts getting lured into the darker side of life, she discovers who her father really is.

  • BACK TO THE FUTURE IV

    Michel Labbe

    • Bookelis
    • 27 Décembre 2018

    In 2055, due to global warming, the ice at the two poles had melted and caused a change in the earth's rotational axis. Some of the inhabitants of northern Europe, Norway, Sweden, Scotland, Ireland, Iceland and Greenland had come to settle in what was known as California on the outskirts of Hill Valley. Rigor Strickland, or the Northern clan, had been mandated by CENE (Council of the Elders of New Earth) to locate a certain Baff 'The Terrible' Tannen of the Groalian clan, accused of the rape and murder of princess Gaëla. Doc, Marty, Jules and Verne arrive in this new episode of BTTF to search for a precious manuscript that has been lost in time. This document is the only hope that can save Wilmor Clayton (Clara's father) from a perilous duel in 1895.

  • Nobody really knows who these men are- men in black dropped off by a helicopter on the outskirts of a small Afghan village; wading through swamps in Croatia, intent on killing a war criminal; who ensure the protection of a Canadian General in Rwanda; who subdue hostage takers in Peru; and who prove, on-site, the Serbian disarmament lies told by President Milosevic.

    DENIS MORISSET was part of the initial sixteen-member Joint Task Force 2 (JTF 2) unit from 1993-2001. His extensive and rigorous training and hardships will make more than one reader realize that his being alive today is nothing short of a miracle. Seven members of his unit have not lived to tell the tale.
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    Canada, for good reason, will never render justice to these anonymous combatants whose only medals of bravery are the numerous scars still visible on their bullet-proof vests.

    Unlike the British SAS and the United States' Delta Force, this special Canadian intervention unit was, according to David Rudd of the Canadian Institute of Strategic Studies, trained "to infiltrate into dangerous areas behind enemy lines, look for key targets and take them out. They don't go out to arrest people. They don't go out there to hand out food parcels. They go out to kill targets."

  • There is nothing peaceful about Samia Shariff's account. Life has not been easy for this Algerian woman, who was born in France. The third child in a Muslim family whose father is a prosperous and respected businessman, Samia was not welcome in a clan where the birth of a daughter was considered a punishment from Allah!

    A powerful, at times almost unbearable narrative, Veil of Fear draws us into a world of men who justify most of their actions towards women by means of an abusive interpretation of the Koran and its teaching. Thus, from the time of her birth, Samia lives in fear. In fear of her mother, of her father, of the husband she was forced to marry at the age of 16, of the fundamentalists who constantly threaten her, of the obstetricians who want to put her to sleep, of what might happen to her children, of fleeing towards the unknown, of choosing freedom over assured wealth and, above all, of making her daughters live through the same torments she has experienced. Humiliated, beaten, raped, harassed, she had the intelligence and courage to break out of the infernal circle in which a woman depends on the totalitarian power of a man, from generation to generation. Thus, in November 2001, using false passports for herself and her five children, she crossed the Atlantic Ocean and took refuge in Canada, where she was finally able to start a real life as a mother and woman.

    In a style that is both simple and effective, Samia recounts her life, her trials and, above all, her victories. For several decades she was the instrument of a completely incredible belief system that granted her no rights whatsoever, not even the right to love or even live in peace. In this respect, she is now the spokeswoman for millions of other women who have stories that are similar and possibly even worse, to tell us. In her own words, Samia says, "I lost everything I had in order to obtain what I never had: peace and love."

  • Anglais Snowchild

    Marie-Bernadette Dupuy

    The Epiphany, 1916.
    On an unforgivingly cold winter's night in Val-Jalbert, Lac-Saint-Jean, a twelve month-old child, wrapped in furs, is discovered by a nun from the convent school. The discovery of this abandoned girl, possibly afflicted by the dreaded chicken pox, deeply upsets the nuns from Notre-Dame-Bon-Conseil who have just taken on their teaching duties. Val-Jalbert, a small factory-town built at the foot of the Ouiatchouan River, is run by the pulp and paper company. The villagers are hard-working and have everything they need. Life in Val Jalbert flows in an orderly fashion, morally irreproachable.

    The child of the night increasingly disrupts the nuns and their neighbors, the Marois family, who eventually take her in. But where does Marie-Hermine, with eyes so blue, come from? Why did her parents drop her off like a heavy burden on the steps of the convent school? Over the years, the orphan girl will become affectionately known as ``the Winter Nightingale'' because of her extroardinary voice, and she will become the pride of the factory village which is later abandoned, doomed after the closure of the industry in 1927. Homes are now empty, gardens left unattended, and the nuns leave the barren village. During these unfortunate incidents, Marie-Hermine's past resurfaces and jealousies erupt, such as the love of a young metis named Toshan, encountered during a trip to Lac-Saint-Jean.

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