• 1890. Vincent Van Gogh est assassiné à Auvers-sur-Oise par un mystérieux dealer de bleu, « l'Homme-aux-Couleurs ». Toulouse-Lautrec mène l'enquête. Il enrôle son ami Lucien Lessard, peintre-boulanger de la butte Montmartre. Mais Lucien n'a qu'une obsession : brosser le portrait de Juliette, muse magnétique, qui vient de lui offrir un tube de bleu très rare...
    De sa plume débridée, trempée à l'ultramarine, Christopher Moore signe une fabuleuse comédie qui revisite l'histoire et le Paris de l'impressionnisme. Renoir, Pissarro, Toulouse-Lautrec, Monet, Manet, les frères Van Gogh, Gauguin sont victimes d'un piège qui n'est peut-être que celui de l'inspiration. Comment savoir ? Surtout lorsque la muse sort du cadre pour asséner de façon peu académiques ses considérations sur l'art et la manière.
    Sacré Bleu dynamite tous les codes, du roman noir au rose, du livre d'art à la saga. Voici le premier roman bleu.
    Cahier couleurs (32 p.).

  • The birth of Jesus has been well chronicled, as have his glorious teachings, acts, and divine sacrifice after his thirtieth birthday. But no one knows about the early life of the Son of God, the missing years - except Biff, the Messiah's best bud, who has been resurrected to tell the story in this divinely hilarious, yet heartfelt work 'reminiscent of Vonnegut and Douglas Adams' (Philadelphia Inquirer). Verily, the story Biff has to tell is a miraculous one, filled with remarkable journeys, magic, healings, kung fu, corpse reanimations, demons, and hot babes, Even the considerable wiles and devotion of the Saviour's pal may not be enough to divert Joshua from his tragic destiny. But there's no one who loves Josh more - except maybe 'Maggie,' Mary of Magdala - and Biff isn't about to let his extraordinary pal suffer and ascend without a fight.

  • Twas the night (okay, more like the week) before Christmas and little Joshua Barker is in desperate need of a Christmas miracle. Josh is sure he saw Santa take a shovel to the head and now the seven year old has only one prayer: Please Santa, come back from the dead!But coming to Earth, seeking a small child whose wish needs granting, is none other than Archangel Raziel. Unfortunately, he's not sporting the brightest halo in the bunch and before you can say 'Kris Kringle,' he's botched his sacred mission and sent the residents of Pine Cove headlong into Christmas chaos, culminating in the most hilarious and horrifying holiday party the town has ever seen.

  • Being undead sucks. Literally. Just ask C. Thomas Flood. Waking up after a fantastic night unlike anything he's ever experienced, he discovers that his girlfriend, Jody, is a vampire. And surprise! Now he's one, too. For some couples, the whole biting-and-blood thing would have been a deal breaker. But Tommy and Jody are in love, and they vow to work through their issues. But word has it that the vampire who initially nibbled on Jody wasn't supposed to be recruiting. Even worse, Tommy's erstwhile turkey-bowling pals are out to get him, at the urging of a blue-dyed Las Vegas call girl named (duh) Blue. And that really sucks.

  • Just 50,000 years ago, our hunter-gatherer ancestors ventured off the African savannah and into the wider world. Now, our technology reaches far out into the cosmos. How did we get to where we are today?
    With lively text and colorful illustrations, From Then to Now explains how individual societies struggled to find their own paths, despite war, disease, slavery, natural disasters, and the relentless growth of human knowledge. From Hammurabi to Henry Ford, from Incan couriers to the Internet, from the Taj Mahal to the Eiffel Tower, from Marco Polo to Martin Luther King, from Cleopatra to Catherine the Great, from boiled haggis to fried tarantulas – this is no less than the story of humanity. It’s the story of how we grew apart over all those years of migration and division, and how – as we recognize our common heritage and our often mixed ancestry – we can come together.
    An index, maps, and notes make this a must-have reference, as well as a delight to read and to discuss. From Then to Now is bound to create a generation of history buffs!
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • In 1783 and 1784, some fifty thousand Americans felt that they could not support the revolution against Britain. They were called Loyalists - and there would be no place for them in the new United States.
    As they streamed into the Canadian colonies to the north, they changed forever the face of settlement there. Their arrival would eventually lead to the formation of the provinces of New Brunswick and Ontario.
    First published in hardcover in 1984, the bicentenary of the migration, The Loyalists tells the very human story of these people - of the societies that shaped them, the attitudes that motivated them, and the circumstances that determined their future and influenced the future of Canada. It went on to win the Secretary of State's Prize for Excellence in Canadian Studies.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

  • "In the 1860s, western alienation began at Yonge Street, and George Brown was the Preston Manning of the day." So begins Christopher Moore's fascinating 1990s look at the messy, dramatic, crisis-ridden process that brought Canada into being - and at the politicians, no more lovable or united than our own, who, against all odds, managed to forge a deal that worked.
    From the first chapter, he turns a fresh, perceptive, and lucid eye on the people, the issues, and the political theories of Confederation - from John A. Macdonald's canny handling of leadership to the invention of federalism and the Senate, from the Quebec question to the influence of political philosophers Edmund Burke and Walter Bagehot.
    This is a book for all Canadians who love their country - and fear for it after the failure of the constitution-making of the 1990s. Here is a clear, entertaining reintroduction to the ideas and processes that forged the nation.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • While some lovers were born to run, Jody and Tommy were born to bite. Well, reborn, that is, now that they're vampires. Good thing theirs is an undying love, since their Goth Girl Friday, Abby Normal, has imprisoned them in a bronze statue. Abby is keen to be one of the undead, too, but first she and her PhD-candidate boyfriend Steve have to deal with the huge vampire cat, Chet, who is stalking the city - and creating his own minions.And then Jody and Tommy free themselves from the statue and they are NOT happy...

  • Charlie Asher is a pretty normal guy. A little hapless, somewhat neurotic, more of a Beta than an Alpha Male. Charlie's been lucky, though. He owns a building in the heart of San Francisco, and runs a second-hand store with the help of a couple of loyal, if marginally insane, employees. He's married to a bright and pretty woman who actually loves him for his normality. And she, Rachel, is about to have their first child.

    But normal service is about to be interrupted. As Charlie prepares to go home after the birth, he sees a strange man dressed in mint-green at Rachel's hospital bedside - a man who claims that no one should be able to see him. But see him Charlie does, and from here on out, things get really weird. . . .

    People start dropping dead around him, giant ravens perch on his building, and it seems that everywhere he goes, a dark presence whispers to him from under the streets. Strange names start appearing on his nightstand notepad, and before he knows it, those people end up dead, too. Yep, it seems that Charlie Asher has been recruited for a new job, an unpleasant but utterly necessary one: Death.

    It's a dirty job. But hey, somebody's gotta do it.

  • Just why do humpback whales sing? That's the question that has marine biologist Nate Quinn and his crew poking, charting, recording and photographing very big, wet, gray marine mammals. That is, until the extraordinary day when a whale lifts its tail into the air to display a cryptic message spelled out in foot-high letters: BITE ME.

    Trouble is, Nate's beginning to wonder if he hasn't spent just a little too much time in the sun. 'Cause no one else saw a thing- not his longtime partner, Clay Demodocus; not their saucy young research assistant; not even the spliff-puffing white-boy Rastaman Kona (ne Preston Applebaum). But later, when a roll of film returns from the lab missing the crucial tail shot- and his research facility is trashed- Nate realizes something very fishy indeed is going on.

  • Jody never asked to become a vampire. But when she wakes up under an alley Dumpster with a badly burned arm, an aching neck, superhuman strength, and a distinctly Nosferatuan thirst, she realises the decision has been made for her. Making the transition from the nine-to-five grind to an eternity of nocturnal prowlings is going to take some doing, however, and that's where C. Thomas Flood fits in. A would-be Kerouac from Incontinence, Indiana, Tommy (to his friends) is biding his time night-clerking and frozen turkey bowling in a San Francisco Safeway. But all that changes when a beautiful, undead redhead walks through the door ... and proceeds to rock Tommy's life - and afterlife - in ways he never imagined possible.

  • In Christopher Moore's ingenious debut novel, we meet one of the most memorably mismatched pairs in the annals of literature. The good-looking one is one-hundred-year-old ex-seminarian and 'roads' scholar Travis O'Hearn. The green one is Catch, a demon with a nasty habit of eating most of the people he meets. Behind the fake Tudor façade of Pine Cove, California, Catch sees a four-star buffet. Travis, on the other hand, thinks he sees a way of ridding himself of his toothy travelling companion. The winos, neo-pagans, and deadbeat Lotharios of Pine Cove, meanwhile, have other ideas. And none of them is quite prepared when all hell breaks loose.

  • As a boy growing up in Montana, he was Samson Hunts Alone - until a deadly misunderstanding with the law forced him to flee the Crow reservation at age fifteen. Today he is Samuel Hunter, a successful Santa Barbara insurance salesman with a Mercedes, a condo, and a hollow, invented life. Then one day, shortly after his thirty-fifth birthday, destiny offers him the dangerous gift of love - in the exquisite form of Calliope Kincaid - and a curse in the unheralded appearance of an ancient Indian god by the name of Coyote. Coyote, the trickster, has arrived to transform tranquillity into chaos, to reawaken the mystical storyteller within Sam ... and to seriously screw up his existence in the process.

  • A man of infinite jest, Pocket has been Lear's cherished fool for years, from the time the king's grown daughters - selfish, scheming Goneril, sadistic but hot Regan, and sweet, loyal Cordelia - were mere girls. So he can see trouble brewing when Lear demands that his kids swear their undying love and devotion before a collection of assembled guests. Of course Goneril and Regan are only too happy to brownnose Dad. But Cordelia's blunt honesty ends up costing her her rightful share of the kingdom and earns her a banishment to boot.
    The only person who can possibly make things right is Pocket, who has already managed to sidestep catastrophe on numerous occasions, using his razor-sharp mind, rapier wit and the equally well-honed daggers he keeps conveniently hidden behind his back. He's going to have to do some very fancy maneuvering - cast some spells, incite a few assassinations, start a war or two (the usual stuff) - and shag every lusciously shaggable wench who's amenable along the way. Pocket may be a fool . . . but he's definitely not an idiot.

  • Take a wonderfully crazed excursion into the demented heart of a tropical paradise - a world of cargo cults, cannibals, mad scientists, ninjas, and talking fruit bats. Our bumbling hero is Tucker Case, a hopeless geek trapped in a cool guy's body, who makes a living as a pilot for the Mary Jean Cosmetics Corporation. But when he demolishes his boss's pink plane during a drunken airborne liaison, Tuck must run for his life from Mary Jean's goons. Now there's only one employment opportunity left for him: piloting shady secret missions for an unscrupulous medical missionary and a sexy blond high priestess on the remotest of Micronesian hells. Here is a brazen, ingenious, irreverent, and wickedly funny novel from a modern master of the outrageous.

  • The town psychiatrist has decided to switch everybody in Pine Cove, California, from their normal antidepressants to placebos, so naturally - well, to be accurate, artificially - business is booming at the local blues bar. Trouble is, those lonely slide-guitar notes have also attracted a colossal sea beast named Steve with, shall we say, a thing for explosive oil tanker trucks. Suddenly, morose Pine Cove turns libidinous and is hit by a mysterious crime wave. A beleaguered constable has to fight off his own gonzo appetites to find out what's wrong and what, if anything, to do about it.

  • For Chris Moore, the Great War has developed from a childhood fascination to a full-blown obsession, both for the actuality, of the war - its archives and its archaeology - as well as its abiding influence on English language, manners and customs.Exasperated with the emphasis most war literature places on the officers, generals and political leaders, Chris Moore decided to trace the war-time experiences of one man, one personal history among the six million voiceless ranks of Britons in uniform. He chose Private Walter Butterworth, Fifth Battalion, the Leicestershire Regiment, an obscure infantryman in a disparaged outfit of amateurs that somehow managed to win one of the greatest battles of history - who also happened to be Chris Moore's grandfather.In TRENCH FEVER, Chris Moore retrieves his grandfather's war-song by following (with reluctant family in tow) the three year march of the Fifth Leicesters through France and Flanders.

  • Roger: A code word for a gas cylinder and a nickname for rum. Sausage: An observation balloon. Whippet: A small, light type of tank with a top sped of eight m.p.h. The First World War raged for four years, taking with it hundreds of thousands of young soldiers who lived and died together, bonded by the horror of the war. Now, all the way from the trenches and through the letters of Christopher Moore's Captain Cartwright, comes an extraordinary lexicon of the phrases and lingo of life at the front. Whether born from the desperation of gallows humour ('If it keeps on like this, someone's going to get hurt'), borrowed from Cockney rhyming slang, Latin, French and other languages ('Cushy: Comfortable, safe, pleasant. From the Hindustani: khush, pleasure') or even taken from the name of the Huntley and Palmer biscuit company, Tommy had a new word for almost everything. From Ammo to Zig-Zag, this is a fascinating glimpse into the world of our First World War heroes. So fetch the dooly and the other makings, brew up some char, and read on safe in the knowledge that you won't be going over the top today...

  • Anglais Champlain

    Christopher Moore

    "One July day four hundred years ago, Samuel de Champlain stepped out of a small boat at Quebec and began a great adventure." So begins Christopher Moore's riveting account of the life of the extraordinary, daring "father of New France."
    Samuel de Champlain helped found the first permanent French settlement in the New World; he established the village that eventually became the great city of Quebec; he was a skilled cartographer who gave us many of our first accurate maps of North America; he forged alliances with Native nations that laid the foundations for vast trading networks; and as governor, he set New France on the road to becoming a productive, self-sufficient, thriving colony.
    But Champlain was also a man who suffered his share of defeats and disappointments. That first permanent settlement was abandoned after a disastrous winter claimed the lives of half the colonists. His marriage to a child bride was unhappy and marked by long separations. Eventually Quebec had to be surrendered temporarily to the English in 1629.
    In this remarkable book, illustrated entirely with paintings, archival maps, and original artifacts, Christopher Moore brings to life this complex man and, through him, creates a portrait of Canada in its earliest days.
    Champlain is illustrated with archival maps and paintings. Additional artwork has been provided by Francis Back.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • In 1864, thirty-three delegates from five provincial legislatures came to Quebec City to pursue the idea of uniting all the provinces of British North America. The American Civil War, not yet over, encouraged the small and barely defended provinces to consider uniting for mutual protection. But there were other factors: the rapid expansion of railways and steamships spurred visions of a continent-spanning new nation. Federation, in principle, had been agreed on at the Charlottetown conference, but now it was time to debate the difficult issues of how a new nation would be formed. The delegates included John A. Macdonald, George Etienne-Cartier, and George Brown. Historian Christopher Moore demonstrates that Macdonald, the future prime minister, surprisingly was not the most significant player here, and Canada could have become a very different place. The significance of this conference is played out in Canadian news each day. The main point of contention at the time was the issue of power--a strong federal body versus stronger provincial rights. Because of this conference, we have an elected House of Commons, an appointed Senate, a federal Parliament, and provincial legislatures. We have what amounts to a Canadian system of checks and balances. Did it work then, and does it work now?

  • Par-delà le sourire thaï et le waï plein de grâce, s'étend un paysage ravagé par la violence, un monde où le fait de perdre la face et le jeu des rivalités entraînent presque toujours une issue fatale, où aucun présage n'annonce le danger qui, la plupart du temps, est invisible, voire inimaginable. Survolez au grand jour la surface de Bangkok, et le monde du noir vous semblera à des années-lumière. Cette surface est raffinée, agréable et amusante. Mais creusez plus profondément, et le paradis tropical cédera la place à un purgatoire froid et enténébré, peuplé d'âmes en peine - des âmes échouées, cabossées et ostracisées. Les durs à cuire, les flics honnêtes comme les véreux, les ratés, les tourmentés, les petites gens comme les plus puissants, les transsexuels et les épouses secondaires, les expatriés et les créatures de l'au-delà, tous trouvent leur place dans Bangkok Noir. Mais le coeur de ce recueil, ce sont les doutes existentiels qui rongent les personnages.

  • When Calvino is hired by a retired Thai general to deal with a corrupt and deadbeat tenant, he almost immediately has to evade an assassination attempt. Figuring that it might be best to lay low for a while, Calvino heads for the beach. But trouble only follows him there, as a beautiful young woman falls to her death from the hotel room above his. Back in Bangkok, Calvino is hired to tail a politician running for election. His investigation draws him into a shady world of private contractors, UN officials, and city politics. As he closes in on his target, his run of bad luck brings him ever closer to danger until Calvino realises he could be the target himself.When Calvino is hired by a retired Thai general to deal with a corrupt and deadbeat tenant, he almost immediately has to evade an assassination attempt. Figuring that it might be best to lay low for a while, Calvino heads for the beach. But trouble only follows him there, as a beautiful young woman falls to her death from the hotel room above his. Back in Bangkok, Calvino is hired to tail a politician running for election. His investigation draws him into a shady world of private contractors, UN officials, and city politics. As he closes in on his target, his run of bad luck brings him ever closer to danger until Calvino realises he could be the target himself.

  • The African-American contribution to winning World War II has never been celebrated as profoundly as in Fighting for America. In this inspirational and uniquely personal tribute, the essential part played by black servicemen and -women in that cataclysmic conflict is brought home.
    Here are letters, photographs, oral histories, and rare documents, collected by historian Christopher Moore, the son of two black WWII veterans. Weaving his family history with that of his people and nation, Moore has created an unforgettable tapestry of sacrifice, fortitude, and courage. From the 1,800 black soldiers who landed at Normandy Beach on D-Day, and the legendary Tuskegee Airmen who won ninety-five Distinguished Flying Crosses, to the 761st Tank Battalion who, under General Patton, helped liberate Nazi death camps, the invaluable effort of black Americans to defend democracy is captured in word and image.
    Readers will be introduced to many unheralded heroes who helped America win the war, including Dorie Miller, the messman who manned a machine gun and downed four Japanese planes; Robert Brooks, the first American to die in armored battle; Lt. Jackie Robinson, the future baseball legend who faced court-martial for refusing to sit in the back of a military bus; an until now forgotten African-American philosopher who helped save many lives at a Japanese POW camp; even the author's own parents: his mother, Kay, a WAC when she met his father, Bill, who was part of the celebrated Red Ball Express.
    Yet Fighting for America is more than a testimonial; it is also a troubling story of profound contradictions, of a country still in the throes of segregation, of a domestic battleground where arrests and riots occurred simultaneously with foreign service-and of how the war helped spotlight this disparity and galvanize the need for civil rights. Featuring a unique perspective on black soldiers, Fighting for America will move any reader: all who, like the author, owe their lives to those who served.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • The quintessential A to Z guide to British Englishperfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrierOscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language."Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when told to pick up the "dog and bone" or "head to the loo," so they can "spend a penny." Wherever did these peculiar expressions come from?British author Christopher J. Moore made a name for himself on this side of the pond with the sleeper success of his previous book, In Other Words. Now, Moore draws on history, literature, pop culture, and his own heritage to explore the phrases that most embody the British character. He traces the linguistic influence of writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and Dickens to Wodehouse, and unravels the complexity Brits manage to imbue in seemingly innocuous phrases like "All right."Along the way, Moore reveals the uniquely British origins of some of the English languages more curious sayings. For example: Who is Bob and how did he become your uncle? Why do we refer to powerless politicians as lame ducks? How did posh become such a stylish word?Part language guide, part cultural study, How to Speak Brit is the perfect addition to every Anglophiles library and an entertaining primer that will charm the linguistic-minded legions.

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