• The thought suddenly occurred to Morse that this would be a marvellous time to murder a few of the doddery old bachelor dons. No wives to worry about their whereabouts; no landladies to whine about the unpaid rents. In fact nobody would miss most of them at all . . . By the 16th of July the Master of Lonsdale was concerned, but not yet worried. Dr Browne-Smith had passed through the porters lodge at approximately 8.15 a.m. on the morning of Friday, 11th July. And nobody had heard from him since. Plenty of time to disappear, thought Morse. And plenty of time, too, for someone to commit murder . . .

  • Anglais Secret of Annexe 3

    Dexter Colin

    Morse sought to hide his disappointment. So many people in the Haworth Hotel that fateful evening had been wearing some sort of disguise – a change of dress, a change of make-up, a change of partner, a change of attitude, a change of life almost; and the man who had died had been the most consummate artist of them all . . . Chief Inspector Morse seldom allowed himself to be caught up in New Year celebrations. So the murder inquiry in the festive hotel had a certain appeal. It was a crime worthy of the season. The corpse was still in fancy dress. And hardly a single guest at the Haworth had registered under a genuine name . . .

  • As he drove his chief down to Kidlington, Lewis returned the conversation to where it had begun. ‘You haven’t told me what you think about this fellow Owens – the dead woman’s nextdoor neighbour.’ ‘Death is always the nextdoor neighbour,’ said Morse sombrely. The murder of a young woman . . . A cryptic ‘seventeenthcentury’ love poem . . . And a photograph of a mystery greyhaired man . . . More than enough to set Chief Inspector E. Morse on the trail of a killer. And it’s a trail that leads him to Lonsdale College, where the contest between Julian Storrs and Dr Denis Cornford for the coveted position of Master is hotting up. But then Morse faces a greater, far more personal crisis . . .

  • Anglais Daughters of Cain

    Dexter Colin

    "AUDACIOUS AND AMUSING. . . MAY BE THE BEST BOOK YET IN THIS DESERVEDLY CELEBRATED SERIES." --The Wall Street Journal It was only the second time Inspector Morse had ever taken over a murder enquiry after the preliminary--invariably dramatic--discovery and sweep of the crime scene. Secretly pleased to have missed the blood and gore, Morse and the faithful Lewis go about finding the killer who stabbed Dr. Felix McClure, late of Wolsey College. In another part of Oxford, three women--a housecleaner, a schoolteacher, and a prostitute--are playing out a drama that has long been unfolding. It will take much brain work, many pints, and not a little anguish before Morse sees the startling connections between McClure's death and the daughters of Cain. . . .
    "VERY CLEVERLY CONSTRUCTED. . . Dexter writes with an urbanity and range of reference that is all his own." --Los Angeles Times "YOU DON'T REALLY KNOW MORSE UNTIL YOU'VE READ HIM. . . . Viewers who have enjoyed British actor John Thaw as Morse in the PBS'Mystery!' anthology series should welcome the deeper character development in Dexter's novels." --Chicago Sun-Times "A MASTERFUL CRIME WRITER WHOM FEW OTHERS MATCH." --Publishers Weekly From the Paperback edition.

  • Anglais Last Seen Wearing

    Dexter Colin

    Morse was beset by a nagging feeling. Most of his fanciful notions about the Taylor girl had evaporated and he had begun to suspect that further investigation into Valeries disappearance would involve little more than sober and tedious routine . . . The statements before Inspector Morse appeared to confirm the bald, simple truth. After leaving home to return to school, teenager Valerie Taylor had completely vanished, and the trail had gone cold. Until two years, three months and two days after Valeries disappearance, somebody decides to supply some surprising new evidence for the case . . .

  • 'Do you think I'm wasting your time, Lewis?' Lewis was nobody's fool and was a man of some honesty and integrity. 'Yes, sir.' An engaging smile crept across Morse's mouth. He thought they could get on well together . . .' The death of Sylvia Kaye figured dramatically in Thursday afternoon's edition of the Oxford Mail. By Friday evening Inspector Morse had informed the nation that the police were looking for a dangerous man facing charges of wilful murder, sexual assault and rape. But as the obvious leads fade into twilight and darkness, Morse becomes more and more convinced that passion holds the key . . .
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  • The sweet countenance of Reason greeted Morse serenely when he woke, and told him that it would be no bad idea to have a quiet look at the problem itself before galloping off to a solution. Chief Inspector Morse was alone among the congregation in suspecting continued unrest in the quiet parish of St Frideswides. Most people could still remember the churchwardens murder. A few could still recall the murderers suicide. Now even the police had closed the case. Until a chance meeting among the tombstones reveals startling new evidence of a conspiracy to deceive . . .

  • Anglais Dead of Jericho

    Dexter Colin

    Morse switched on the gramophone to play, and sought to switch his mind away from all the terrestrial troubles. Sometimes, this way, he almost managed to forget. But not tonight . . . Anne Scotts address was scribbled on a crumpled note in the pocket of Morses smartest suit. He turned the corner of Canal Street, Jericho, on the afternoon of Wednesday, 3rd October. He hadnt planned a second visit. But he was back later the same day as the officer in charge of a suicide investigation . . .

  • Anglais Jewel that was Ours

    Dexter Colin

    He looked overweight around the midriff, though nowhere else, and she wondered whether perhaps he drank too much. He looked weary, as if he had been up most of the night conducting his investigations . . . For Oxford, the arrival of twentyseven American tourists is nothing out of the ordinary . . . until one of their number is found dead in Room 310 at the Randolph Hotel. It looks like a sudden and tragic accident. Only Chief Inspector Morse appears not to overlook the simultaneous theft of a jewelencrusted antique from the victims handbag . . . Then, two days later, a naked and battered corpse is dragged from the River Cherwell. A coincidence? Maybe. But this time Morse is determined to prove the link . . .

  • Anglais Remorseful Day

    Dexter Colin

    Where does this all leave us, sir? Things are moving fast. Were getting near the end, you mean? We were always near the end. The murder of Yvonne Harrison had left Thames Valley CID baffled. A year after the dreadful crime they are still no nearer to making an arrest. But one man has yet to tackle the case and it is just the sort of puzzle at which Chief Inspector Morse excels. So why is he adamant that he will not lead the reinvestigation, despite the entreaties of Chief Superintendent Strange and dark hints of some new evidence? And why, if he refuses to take on the case officially, does he seem to be carrying out his own private enquiries? For Sergeant Lewis this is yet another example of the unsettling behaviour his chief has been displaying of late . . .

  • Morse had never ceased to wonder why, with the staggering advances in medical science, all pronouncements concerning times of death seemed so disconcertingly vague. The newly appointed member of the Oxford Examinations Syndicate was deaf, provincial and gifted. Now he is dead . . . And his murder, in his north Oxford home, proves to be the start of a formidably labyrinthine case for Chief Inspector Morse, as he tries to track down the killer through the insular and bitchy world of the Oxford Colleges . . .

  • Featuring the first three books in this classic crime series starring Inspector Morse: Last Bus to Woodstock, Last Seen Wearing and The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn. Last Bus to Woodstock: The death of Sylvia Kaye figured dramatically in Thursday afternoon's edition of the Oxford Mail. By Friday evening Inspector Morse had informed the nation that the police were looking for a dangerous man - facing charges of wilful murder, sexual assault and rape. But as the obvious leads fade into twilight and darkness, Morse becomes more and more convinced that passion holds the key . . . Last Seen Wearing: Morse was beset by a nagging feeling. Most of his fanciful notions about the Taylor girl had evaporated and he had begun to suspect that further investigation into Valerie's disappearance would involve little more than sober and tedious routine . . . The statements before Inspector Morse appeared to confirm the bald, simple truth. After leaving home to return to school, teenager Valerie Taylor had completely vanished, and the trail had gone cold. Until two years, three months and two days after Valerie's disappearance, somebody decides to supply some surprising new evidence for the case . . . The Silent World of Nicholas Quinn. Morse had never ceased to wonder why, with the staggering advances in medical science, all pronouncements concerning times of death seemed so disconcertingly vague. The newly appointed member of the Oxford Examinations Syndicate was deaf, provincial and gifted. Now he is dead . . . And his murder, in his north Oxford home, proves to be the start of a formidably labyrinthine case for Chief Inspector Morse, as he tries to track down the killer through the insular and bitchy world of the Oxford Colleges . . .

  • Morse had solved so many mysteries in his life. Was he now, he wondered beginning to glimpse the solution to the greatest mystery of them all . . . ? How can the discovery of a short story by a beautiful Oxford graduate lead Chief Inspector Morse to her murderer? What awaits Morse and Lewis in Room 231 of the Randolph Hotel? Why does a theft at Christmas lead the detective to look upon the festive season with uncharacteristic goodwill? And what happens when Morse himself falls victim to a brilliantly executed crime? This dazzling collection of short stories from Inspector Morses creator, Colin Dexter, includes six ingenious cases for the worlds most popular fictional detective plus five other tantalizingly original tales to delight all lovers of classic crime fiction.

  • Portée disparue

    Colin Dexter

    Pourquoi une lycéenne disparue depuis plus de deux enverrait-elle soudain un mot à ses parents ? La deuxième enquête de l'inspecteur Morse. Une série qui a valu à Colin Dexter plusieurs récompenses majeures et est diffusée sur France 3.
    " Colin Dexter est captivant. Ses histoires sont un peu extravagantes, délibérément, à l'image de son inspecteur, qui joue à mener l'enquête avec désinvolture. "
    Le Magazine littéraire
    Valerie Taylor, jolie lycéenne de 17 ans, a disparu il y a deux ans, trois mois et deux jours lorsque ses parents recoivent ce mot posté de Londres : " Tout va bien. Bons baisers, Valerie. "
    Alors l'espoir renaît. Sauf pour Morse, qui n'a aucune envie de reprendre l'enquête. Mais son supérieur insiste. Morse part donc en compagnie de son fidèle Lewis écumer les pubs et les boîtes à strip-tease de Londres à la recherche d'une piste.
    Dur métier que celui d'inspecteur ! Surtout quand on est persuadé que la personne qu'on recherche a été assassinée...
    Avec ce deuxième roman mettant en scène l'inspecteur Morse, Colin Dexter démontre qu'il a su créer un personnage et un univers à part dans l'univers de la littérature policière.

  • Qui a tué la jeune Sylvia Kaye, auto-stoppeuse dont on a retrouvé le corps dans la cour d'un pub de Woodstock, non loin d'Oxford ? La première enquête de l'inspecteur Morse de nouveau disponible. Une série qui a valu à Colin Dexter plusieurs récompenses majeures et a connu plusieurs adaptations pour la télévision.
    " Morse est l'un détectives les plus suffisants, les plus susceptibles et brillants depuis Hercule Poirot. " The New York Times Book Review
    La dernière fois qu'on a vu vivante la jolie Sylvia Kaye, elle faisait du stop pour se rendre à Woodstock, non loin d'Oxford. Puis on a retrouvé son corps dénudé dans la cour d'un pub.
    Alors que les pistes se multiplient, l'inspecteur Morse voit la perspective de résoudre rapidement l'enquête s'éloigner peu à peu. Qu'ils soient des universitaires distingués ou de simples employés d'une compagnie d'assurances, tous les suspects lui mentent !
    Morse est cependant persuadé que la seconde auto-stoppeuse vue en compagnie de Sylvia est la clé de l'énigme. Mais sa confiance est ébranlée par la nonchalance de celle-ci quand il la trouve enfin. Son charme aussi le déstabilise...
    Avec ce premier roman, Colin Dexter créait un personnage atypique, qui a depuis pris place au Panthéon de la littérature policière aux côtés des plus grands.

  • "AUDACIOUS AND AMUSING. . . MAY BE THE BEST BOOK YET IN THIS DESERVEDLY CELEBRATED SERIES."The Wall Street JournalIt was only the second time Inspector Morse had ever taken over a murder enquiry after the preliminaryinvariably dramaticdiscovery and sweep of the crime scene. Secretly pleased to have missed the blood and gore, Morse and the faithful Lewis go about finding the killer who stabbed Dr. Felix McClure, late of Wolsey College. In another part of Oxford, three womena housecleaner, a schoolteacher, and a prostituteare playing out a drama that has long been unfolding. It will take much brain work, many pints, and not a little anguish before Morse sees the startling connections between McClure's death and the daughters of Cain. . . ."VERY CLEVERLY CONSTRUCTED. . . Dexter writes with an urbanity and range of reference that is all his own."Los Angeles Times"YOU DON'T REALLY KNOW MORSE UNTIL YOU'VE READ HIM. . . . Viewers who have enjoyed British actor John Thaw as Morse in the PBS'Mystery!' anthology series should welcome the deeper character development in Dexter's novels."Chicago SunTimes"A MASTERFUL CRIME WRITER WHOM FEW OTHERS MATCH."Publishers WeeklyFrom the Paperback edition.

  • For a year, the murder of Mrs. Yvonne Harrison at her home in Oxfordshire had baffled the Thames Valley CID. The manner of her deathher naked handcuffed body left lying in bedmatched her reputation as a women of adventuresome sexual tastes. The case seemed perfect for Inspector Morse. So why has he refused to become involvedeven after anonymous hints of new evidence, even after a fresh murder? Sgt. Lewis's loyalty to his infuriating boss slowly turns to deep distress as his own investigations suggest that Mrs. Harrison was no stranger to Morse. Far from it. Never has Morse performed more brilliantly than in this final adventure, whose masterly twists and turns through the shadowy byways of passion grip us to the death...From the Paperback edition.

  • Why would a sniper shoot suburban physiotherapist Rachel James as she sips her morning coffee? Inspector Morse's hunt for answers kicks off with a tabloid journalist, winds through the strip clubs of Soho, then returns to Oxford, where two senior dons and their wives battle for a plum promotion. Then, on the personal front, Inspector Morse receives intimations of his own mortality.
    And while Morse muses on life, he reveals his first name at last. . . .
    From the Paperback edition.

  • "Superbly clueladen...A complex and satisfying puzzle."THE BOSTON SUNDAY GLOBEThe case seems so simple, Inspector Morse deemed it beneath his notice. A wealthy, elderly American tourist has a heart attack in her room at Oxford's luxurious Randolph Hotel. Missing from the scene is the lady's handbag, which contained the Wolvercote Tongue, a priceless jewel that her late husband had bequeathed to the Ashmolean Museum just across the street. Morse proceeds to spend a great deal of time thinkingand drinkingin the hotel's bar, certain the solution is close at handuntil conflicting stories, suspicious doings, and a real murder convince him otherwise...."It is a delight to watch this brilliant, quirky man [Morse] deduce."MINNEAPOLIS STAR & TRIBUNEFrom the Paperback edition.

  • "DELIGHTFUL."--The Wall Street JournalIn short mysteries so brilliantly plotted they'll confound the cleverest of souls, Inspector Morse remains as patient as a cat at a mouse hole in the face of even the most resourceful evildoers. Muldoon, for instance, the one-legged bomber with one fatal weakness . . . the quartet of lovers whose bizarre entanglements Morse deciphers only after a beautiful woman is murdered . . . and those artful dodgers who catch the cunning and very respectful Morse with his pants down. There are mysteries featuring new characters and some familiar ones, including the great Sherlock Holmes, and a royal flush of American crooks. "BRILLIANT . . . Inspector Morse is back, and more than welcome."--Houston Chronicle"Fear not. In Dexter's dexterous hands, the short-form Morse is every bit as wily and irascible as he is in the the popular Morse novels and the long-running PBS Mystery! series."--The Raleigh News & ObserverFrom the Paperback edition.

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