• Tinnitus - the perception of sound in the ear, in the absence of external sound - affects around 250 million people worldwide. It occurs in adults as well as in children, in war veterans and factory workers, in classical musicians, rockstars, and disc jockeys. Consequently, a history of recreational, occupational, and firearm noise exposure may all be associated with an increased likelihood of acquiring tinnitus.
    Being a subjective phenomenon, tinnitus is difficult to measure, though, in the past decade, it has become the subject of intensive scientific research. Research in neuroscience has revealed how tinnitus is generated by the brain when hearing loss occurs, and this research has played a part in helping us understand the cause, diagnosis, and treatment of this disorder.

    The Neuroscience of Tinnitus reviews our current knowledge of the neural substrates of tinnitus. It draws heavily on the author's own extensive work in this field, and is divided into two parts, the first focusing on human models, the second on animal models. The book describes the search for the neural mechanisms that underlie the amplification process resulting in tinnitus, and ways to manage its maladaptive side effects. Based on over 1000 references and the author's own experience, both of tinnitus and the research into its mechanisms, this book is the most comprehensive single-author book on the market. It is a valuable reference source for auditory neuroscientists, and also to those in the fields of audiology, psychology, neurology, and otolaryngology.

  • Auditory temporal processing determines our understanding of speech, our appreciation of music, our ability to localize a sound source, and even to listen to a person in a noisy crowd. Sound is dynamic and as such has temporal and spectral content. In disorders such as auditory neuropathy and MS, problems can occur with these temporal representations of sound, leading to a mismatch between auditory sensitivity and speech discrimination. In dyslexia, specific language impairment, and auditory processing disorders, similar problems occur early in life and set up additional cognitive speech processing problems. It has also been found that in disorders such as autism,schizophrenia and epilepsy, temporal processing deficits can occur.This book reviews comprehensively the mechanisms for temporal processing in the auditory system, looking at how these underlie specific clinical disorders, with implications for their treatment. Written by a prolific researcher in auditory neuroscience, this book is valuable for auditory neuroscientists, audiologist, neurologists, and speech language pathologists.

  • Auditory temporal processing determines our understanding of speech, our appreciation of music, our ability to localize a sound source, and even to listen to a person in a noisy crowd. Sound is dynamic and as such has temporal and spectral content. In disorders such as auditory neuropathy and MS, problems can occur with these temporal representations of sound, leading to a mismatch between auditory sensitivity and speech discrimination. In dyslexia, specific language impairment, and auditory processing disorders, similar problems occur early in life and set up additional cognitive speech processing problems. It has also been found that in disorders such as autism,schizophrenia and epilepsy, temporal processing deficits can occur.This book reviews comprehensively the mechanisms for temporal processing in the auditory system, looking at how these underlie specific clinical disorders, with implications for their treatment. Written by a prolific researcher in auditory neuroscience, this book is valuable for auditory neuroscientists, audiologist, neurologists, and speech language pathologists.

  • Correlative Learning: A Basis for Brain and Adaptive Systems provides a bridge between three disciplines: computational neuroscience, neural networks, and signal processing. First, the authors lay down the preliminary neuroscience background for engineers. The book also presents an overview of the role of correlation in the human brain as well as in the adaptive signal processing world; unifies many well-established synaptic adaptations (learning) rules within the correlation-based learning framework, focusing on a particular correlative learning paradigm, ALOPEX; and presents case studies that illustrate how to use different computational tools and ALOPEX to help readers understand certain brain functions or fit specific engineering applications.

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