• Steve Jobs, adoptado en la infancia por una familia en San Francisco, tuvo una vida llena de experiencia en solo cincuenta y seis cortos años. En este ¿Quién fue ... ? biografía , los niños aprenderán cómo su obsesión con las computadoras y la tecnología a una edad temprana lo llevó a co-fundar y dirigir Apple, además de convertir Pixar en un estudio de animación de vanguardia . Jobs dejó la universidad antes de graduarse y tomó medidas no convencionales en su camino hacia el éxito, pero inspiró a los mejores y los más brillantes que fuera con él y "cambiar el mundo".

  • Joan of Arc was born in a small French village during the worst period of the Hundred Years' War. For generations, France had been besieged by the British. At age 11, Joan began to see religious visions telling her to join forces with the King of France. By the time she was a teenager, she was leading troops into battle in the name of her country. Though she was captured and executed for her beliefs, Joan of Arc became a Catholic saint and has since captured the world's imagination.

  • Susan B. Anthony may be an international icon but her campaign for women's rights had personal roots. Working as a school teacher in New York, Anthony refused to settle for less pay than her male colleagues which ignited her lifelong devotion to women's equality. Anthony toured the United States and Europe giving speeches and publishing articles as one of the most important advocates of women's rights. Learn more about the woman behind the movement in Who Was Susan B. Anthony?

  • Discover more about the comedy team that perfected the art of the pie fight! The Three Stooges were the hardworking children of immigrants and discovered a love of performing at an early age. Starting out as a vaudeville act, they soon transitioned into movies, becoming a worldwide sensation in feature films and shorts. Never the critics' darlings, audiences loved them for their mastery of physical comedy and their willingness to do anything for a laugh. They remained popular over the years despite several personnel changes that revolved around the three Howard brothers from Brooklyn. Their comedies are still in syndication more than 50 years after they were first shown on TV and continue to delight old fans and attract new ones.

  • Meet the man who created Alice, the Mad Hatter, and Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum!
    Lewis Carroll is the pen name of Charles L. Dodgson, a mathematician and church deacon, who taught at Oxford University. He was inspired to write his best known works, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, by one of the Dean's daughters, Alice Liddell. The books were hugely successful and brought Carroll wide acclaim, especially for the nonsense poems "Jabberwocky" and The Hunting of the Snark.
    Children and adults continue to be delighted by the fantasy of the Alice stories, which have been the basis of plays and movies since their publication in Victorian England during the 1860s and 1870s.

  • Read the story of the Founding Father who inspired the smash Broadway musical.
    Born in the British West Indies and orphaned as a child, Alexander Hamilton made his way to the American Colonies and studied to become a lawyer. He joined a local militia during the American Revolution, rose to the rank of Major General, and became the chief aide to General George Washington. After the war, he became the first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. He founded the Bank of New York and The New York Post newspaper. He served as a delegate to the Constitutional Convention and is also celebrated as a co-author of The Federalist Papers, a series of essays that are still used today to interpret the U.S. Constitution.
    The end of his life became a national scandal when he was shot and killed in a duel with then-Vice President Aaron Burr.

  • Best known for his epic Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit, J.R.R. Tolkien was born in British-occupied South Africa. His early life was full of action and adventure. Tolkien spent his childhood roaming the British countryside with his family and could read and write by age four. He was naturally gifted with languages and used this skill as a signals officer in World War I as well as in his fantasy writing. By creating alternate universes and inventing languages in his work he demonstrated that imaginary realms were not just for children. Fondly remembered as the “Father of High Fantasy,” Tolkien’s books have inspired blockbuster movies and legions of fans.
    From the Trade Paperback edition.

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