• Les droits de l'homme

    Thomas Paine

    Avec Les Droits de l'Homme (1791-1792), Paine, Anglais devenu Américain, épouse la cause de la Révolution française, en réponse aux Réflexions sur la Révolution de France, passionnément anti-révolutionnaires, de Burke. L'un des enjeux de cet affrontement fiévreux est la notion de « droits de l'homme » qui, prônés et critiqués, libérateurs quoique si souvent travestis, n'ont certes pas fini, aujourd'hui, de courir le monde.

  • Le sens commun

    Thomas Paine

    " TANT QUE L'INDÉPENDANCE ne sera pas déclarée, le continent se sentira dans la situation d'un homme qui, ne cessant de remettre au lendemain quelque affaire désagréable, sait néanmoins qu'il doit s'en acquitter, répugne à s'y mettre, souhaite en avoir fini et est perpétuellement hanté par l'obsession de sa nécessité. " Thomas Paine, 1776.Publié pour la première fois au Québec, Le Sens commun de Paine est le best-seller de 1776 qui a convaincu les Américains de choisir l'indépendance." La clairvoyance de Paine est tout simplement extraordinaire et fascinante. [...] Les notes biographiques de Jean-Pierre Boyer [...] aident à mieux saisir l'époque et le personnage qu'était Thomas Paine. Le sens commun est indispensable à tous les passionnés d'histoire." Louis-Philippe GRATON, Impact-Campus.
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  • Quand un pays de l'univers, quel qu'il soit, pourra dire: mes pauvres sont heureux; ni l'ignorance ni la détresse ne règne parmi eux; mes geôles sont dépourvues de prisonniers et mes rues de mendiants; la vieillesse n'est pas dans le besoin; les impôts ne sont pas oppressifs; le monde rationnel est mon ami parce que je suis ami de son bonheur: quand il pourra dire ces choses-là, alors ce pays pourra se vanter de sa constitution et de son gouvernement.
    Thomas Paine, 1792 Publié pour la première fois au Québec, Les Droits de l'Homme de Thomas Paine est un ouvrage emblématique des révolutions démocratiques du XVIIIe siècle et demeure un des textes précurseurs de la Déclaration universelle des droits de l'homme de 1948, dont on célèbre cette année le cinquantenaire.

  • Includes the complete texts of Common Sense; Rights of Man, Part the Second; The Age of Reason (part one); Four Letters on Interesting Subjects, published anonymously and just discovered to be Paine’s work; and Letter to the Abbé Raynal, Paine’s first examination of world events; as well as selections from The American CrisesIn 1776, America was a hotbed of enlightenment and revolution. Thomas Paine not only spurred his fellow Americans to action but soon came to symbolize the spirit of the Revolution. His elegantly persuasive pieces spoke to the hearts and minds of those fighting for freedom. He was later outlawed in Britain, jailed in France, and finally labeled an atheist upon his return to America.From the Trade Paperback edition.
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  • This major collection demonstrates the extent to which Thomas Paine (1737-1809) was an inspiration to the Americans in their struggle for independence, a passionate supporter of the French Revolution and perhaps the outstanding English radical writer of his age. It contains all of Paine's major works including The Rights of Man, his groundbreaking defence of the revolutionary cause in France, Common Sense, which won thousands over to the side of the American rebels, and the first part of The Age of Reason (Part One), a ferocious attack on Christianity. The shorter pieces - on capital punishment, social reform and the abolition of slavery - also confirm the great versatility and power of this master of democratic prose.

  • One of the great classics on democracy, Rights of Man was published in England in 1791 as a vindication of the French Revolution and a critique of the British system of government. In direct, forceful prose, Paine defends popular rights, national independence, revolutionary war, and economic growth - all considered dangerous and even seditious issues. In his introduction Eric Foner presents an overview of Paine's career as political theorist and pamphleteer, and supplies essential background material to Rights of Man. He discusses how Paine created a language of modern politics that brought important issues to the common man and the working classes and assesses the debt owed to Paine by the American and British radical traditions.

  • Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are.

  • Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves--and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives--and destroyed them.Now, Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are. Penguin's Great Ideas series features twelve groundbreaking works by some of history's most prodigious thinkers, and each volume is beautifully packaged with a unique type-drive design that highlights the bookmaker's art. Offering great literature in great packages at great prices, this series is ideal for those readers who want to explore and savor the Great Ideas that have shaped the world.Published anonymously in 1776, six months before the Declaration of Independence, Thomas Paine’s Common Sense was a radical and impassioned call for America to free itself from British rule and set up an independent republican government. Savagely attacking hereditary kingship and aristocratic institutions, Paine urged a new beginning for his adopted country in which personal freedom and social equality would be upheld and economic and cultural progress encouraged. His pamphlet was the first to speak directly to a mass audience--it went through fifty-six editions within a year of publication--and its assertive and often caustic style both embodied the democratic spirit he advocated, and converted thousands of citizens to the cause of American independence.

  • Now in paperback, Paine's essential American writings in authoritative Library of America texts: After a life of obscurity and failure in England, Thomas Paine came to America in 1774 at age 37. Within fourteen months he published Common Sense, the most influential pamphlet of the American Revolution, and began a career that would see him hailed and reviled in the American nation he helped create. In Common Sense, Paine sets forth an inspiring vision of an independent America as an asylum for freedom and an example of popular self-government in a world oppressed by despotism and hereditary privilege. The American Crisis, begun during "the times that try men's souls" in 1776, is a masterpiece of popular pamphleteering in which Paine vividly reports current developments, taunts and ridicules British adversaries, and enjoins his readers to remember the immense stakes of their struggle. They are joined in this invaluable reader by a selection of Paine's other American pamphlets and his letters to George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and others.

  • C'est à l'ombre de la guillotine, alors qu'il croit sa dernière heure venue, que le citoyen Thomas PAINE, député "brissotin" à la Convention, écrit "Le siècle de la Raison", improprement appelé la "Bible des Athées". Dans cette oeuvre antidogmatique conçue comme un testament, Thomas PAINE livre ses réflexions philosophiques. Aboutissement des Lumières, cet ouvrage marque aussi le début d'une critique matérialiste scientifique de la Bible et des religion monothéistes.

  • Anglais Winter King

    Thomas Penn

    Winner of THE HW FISHER BEST FIRST BIOGRAPHY PRIZE SPECTATOR BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2012 SUNDAY TIMES, DAILY TELEGRAPH, TLS, FINANCIAL TIMES, GUARDIAN, DAILY MAIL and SUNDAY TELEGRAPH BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2011 'He were a dark prince, and infinitely suspicious, and his times full of secret conspiracies and troubles' Sir Francis Bacon In his remarkable debut, Penn vividly recreates the dark and turbulent reign of Henry VII. He traces the transformation of a young, vulnerable boy, Prince Henry, into the aggressive teenager who would become Henry VIII, and of Catherine of Aragon, his future queen. And at the book's heart is the tragic, magnetic figure of Henry VII - controlling, paranoid, avaricious, with a Machiavellian charm and will to power.

  • Anglais Common Sense

    Paine Thomas

    Includes the complete texts of Common Sense; Rights of Man, Part the Second; The Age of Reason (part one); Four Letters on Interesting Subjects, published anonymously and just discovered to be Paine’s work; and Letter to the Abbé Raynal, Paine’s first examination of world events; as well as selections from The American CrisesIn 1776, America was a hotbed of enlightenment and revolution. Thomas Paine not only spurred his fellow Americans to action but soon came to symbolize the spirit of the Revolution. His elegantly persuasive pieces spoke to the hearts and minds of those fighting for freedom. He was later outlawed in Britain, jailed in France, and finally labeled an atheist upon his return to America.From the Trade Paperback edition.
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  • Thomas Paine was the first international revolutionary. His Common Sense was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution, while his Rights of Man sent out a clarion call for revolution throughout the world.

    This collection brings together Paine's most powerful political writings in the first fully annotated edition of these works. - ;`An army of principles will penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot . . . it will march on the horizon of the world and it will conquer.' Thomas Paine was the first international revolutionary. His Common Sense (1776) was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution; his Rights of Man (1791-2) was the most famous defence of the French Revolution and sent out a clarion call for revolution throughout the world. He paid the price for his principles: he was outlawed in Britain, narrowly escaped execution in France, and was villified as an atheist and a Jacobin on his return to America.

    Paine loathed the unnatural inequalities fostered by the hereditary and monarchical systems. He believed that government must be by and for the people and must limit itself to the protection of their natural rights. But he was not a libertarian: from a commitment to natural rights he generated one of the first blueprints for a welfare state, combining a liberal order of civil rights with egalitarian constraints. This collection brings together Paine's most powerful political writings from the American and French revolutions in the first fully annotated edition of these works. -

  • Thomas Paine was the first international revolutionary. His Common Sense was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution, while his Rights of Man sent out a clarion call for revolution throughout the world.

    This collection brings together Paine's most powerful political writings in the first fully annotated edition of these works. - ;`An army of principles will penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot . . . it will march on the horizon of the world and it will conquer.' Thomas Paine was the first international revolutionary. His Common Sense (1776) was the most widely read pamphlet of the American Revolution; his Rights of Man (1791-2) was the most famous defence of the French Revolution and sent out a clarion call for revolution throughout the world. He paid the price for his principles: he was outlawed in Britain, narrowly escaped execution in France, and was villified as an atheist and a Jacobin on his return to America.

    Paine loathed the unnatural inequalities fostered by the hereditary and monarchical systems. He believed that government must be by and for the people and must limit itself to the protection of their natural rights. But he was not a libertarian: from a commitment to natural rights he generated one of the first blueprints for a welfare state, combining a liberal order of civil rights with egalitarian constraints. This collection brings together Paine's most powerful political writings from the American and French revolutions in the first fully annotated edition of these works. -

  • Thomas Paine was the impassioned democratic voice of the Age of Revolution, and this volume brings together his best-known works: Common Sense, The American Crisis, Rights of Man, The Age of Reason, along with a selection of letters, articles and pamphlets that emphasizes Paine's American years. "I know not whether any man in the world," wrote John Adams in 1805, "has had more influence on its inhabitants or affairs for the last thirty years than Tom Paine." The impassioned democratic voice of the Age of Revolution, Paine wrote for his mass audience with vigor, clarity, and "common sense." This Library of America volume is the first major new edition of his work in 50 years, and the most comprehensive single-volume collection of his writings available. Paine came to America in 1774 at age 37 after a life of obscurity and failure in England. Within fourteen months he published Common Sense, the most influential pamphlet for the American Revolution, and began a career that would see him prosecuted in England, imprisoned and nearly executed in France, and hailed and reviled in the American nation he helped create. In Common Sense, Paine set forth an inspiring vision of an independent America as an asylum for freedom and an example of popular self-government in a world oppressed by despotism and hereditary privilege. The American Crisis, begun during "the times that try men's souls" in 1776, is a masterpiece of popular pamphleteering in which Paine vividly reports current developments, taunts and ridicules British adversaries, and enjoins his readers to remember the immense stakes of their struggle. Among the many other items included in the volume are the combative "Forester" letters, written in a reply to a Tory critic of Common Sense, and several pieces concerning the French Revolution, including an incisive argument against executing Louis XVI. Rights of Man (1791-1792), written in response to Edmund Burke's attacks on the French Revolution, is a bold vision of an egalitarian society founded on natural rights and unbound by tradition. Paine's detailed proposal for government assistance to the poor inspired generations of subsequent radicals and reformers. The Age of Reason (1794-1795), Paine's most controversial work, is an unrestrained assault on the authority of the Bible and a fervent defense of the benevolent God of deism. Included in this volume are a detailed chronology of Paine's life, informative notes, an essay on the complex printing history of Paine's work, and an index.

  • Dans son numéro de l'automne, la revue Circuit souhaite réinterroger le phare de la scène montréalaise des musiques improvisées qu'est Productions SuperMusique, qui souligne ses 40 ans, tout en s'intéressant à des pratiques impliquant l'improvisation ailleurs qu'à Montréal (particulièrement en France et aux États-Unis), ceci sous un angle bien spécifique. En effet, ce numéro propose de sonder d'une oreille nouvelle la question du continuum improvisation/composition, à partir d'une série d'études de cas, d'entretiens et de témoignages permettant d'examiner précisément différents points de ce continuum. Par exemple: quel est le statut accordé par les musiciens à ces éléments prédéterminés? Simples conditions de la performance? Ressources individuelles? Facilitateurs de la coordination entre les musiciens? Obstacles, limitations, contraintes? Quelles stratégies les musiciens utilisent-ils pour contourner (voire pour détourner) les cadres, codes et conventions qui sous-tendent leurs performances? La rubrique Cahier d'analyse est consacrée à deux oeuvres des directrices et fondatrices de Productions SuperMusique, TAGS de Joane Hétu et TanGRAM de Danielle Palardy Roger. (source : Circuit)

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